The Sargent Ponds trails offer an excellent opportunity to bike through the woods on well marked, fairly level, paths. Separate trails lead to Upper and Lower Sargent ponds, with a connecting trail between them. There are a few steep grades along the 3.5-mile loop.

It is possible to make the Upper and Lower ponds into a loop by way of the trail via Middle Pond. Use the marked snowmobile trail north of the ponds to make this connection.

Fishing for brook trout in Sargent Ponds has been a favorite for 100 years. Primitive lean-to camping is available for those who wish carry a pack boat. These lean-to see a lot of visitors.

Distance

This is a 3.5 mile loop.

Location

Start at the three corners in Long Lake and drive south toward Blue Mountain Lake on Route 28N/30. North Point Road will be on the right in 3 miles — drive down North Point Road. There will be a fork in the road a few miles in; right leads to Forked Lake Campsite, left to the trailhead. The trailhead is marked with state DEC signs on the left side of the road at 4.6 miles.

It can take up to 5 hours to hike this loop at a leisurely pace.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as this is a snowmobile trail in the winter.

This trail starts on North Rondaxe Road as a beginner trail, then turns to intermediate past Safford Pond. The trip connects Big Moose Lake and Lake Rondaxe. A 16.5-mile loop is possible using Rondaxe Road, Route 28, and Big Moose Road.

Location

From Inlet, take Route 28 south toward Old Forge. Turn right on Rondaxe, then right on North Rondaxe Road. The parking area and trailhead are on the left.

Distance

It's 4.5 miles one way.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as this is a snowmobile trail in the winter.

The area around this bridge is the favorite spot of fishermen. Off the beaten path, there are many open sandy areas for casting.

This is the North Branch of the Moose River. Bridges and crossings along the bike trails off of North Street in Old Forge offer hundreds of spots for calm water paddling and fishing. Clear water and sandy weed beds are home to a variety of species.

By parking a second car at North Street Bridge, 1 mile from Route 28 near the red, white, and blue bridge in Old Forge, a one-way paddle is possible. And avoids the portage around Indian Rapids. This is a excellent spot for the start of a Mountain Bike Journey on the Town Of Webb Trail System, which gives access to 100 miles of loops. This is also a great location for a long distance family bird hike along the old gravel roadways of the Old Forge Trail System.

Distance

Direct access for Parking / Fishing and Canoe Put in.

24 Miles Round Trip Paddle to Old Forge and Back.

Location

Take Route 28 south from Inlet for 6.5 miles and turn right on Rondaxe Road. Parking is a sandy pull off on the left just before the bridge.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as this is a snowmobile trail in the winter.

 

Known as the Great Eight Lakes, this trail is easy to intermediate and is only 3 miles to Queer Lake, then 2.3 miles to Chain Ponds. Even longer loops to the other loops are possible.

  • Mays Pond, 4.5 miles
  • Chub Lake, 5.1 miles
  • Constable Pond, 5.4 miles
  • Pigeon Lake, 8.7 miles
  • Otter Pond, 12.4 miles

Most people do the 3-mile hike from the trailhead to Queer Lake for an easily accessible yet remote lean-to camping experience. A nice lean-to is ready for use on the point just 500 yards up the trail and to the left when you come to the lake.

Each lake has different fishing qualities, with Queer Lake known for its native lake trout. While birding around these lakes you can look and listen for Olive-Sided and Yellow- Bellied Flycatchers, Nashville Warblers, Northern Parula and Palm Warblers, and Lincoln's, Swamp, and White-Throated Sparrows.(

Location

In Eagle Bay, turn onto Big Moose Road from Route 28. The parking area is on the right, 5.3 miles from Route 28.

Distance

It's 3 miles one way to Queer Lake. This is a Wilderness Area, so no mountain bikes are allowed.

It can take more than 5 hours to hike to Queer Lake and back, although fit hikers can probably do it in less time.

Winter Overview

Winter access here is great for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. The parking area is regularly plowed and the trail has very few elevation changes.

The Moose River Plains Wild Forest is part of the 80,000 acre Moose River Plains Complex, a collection of public lands crossed by more than 40 miles of old dirt logging roads. There are 130 miles of marked trails within the complex, as well as more than 100 primitive roadside tent sites, 65 waterbodies, 100 miles of streams, and a fire tower on Wakely Mountain.

The dirt roads running throughout the complex are rough in places. In the Moose River Plains Wild Forest, Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road is a 23-mile long seasonal access road that's often used by vehicles and mountain bikers. Some of the pitches are steep, but the area is fairly flat by Adirondack standards. You must register at either the Limekiln or Cedar River Road gate, but access is free.

Mountain biking

Welcome to mountain biking heaven. The difficulty level for mountain biking in this area mostly ranges from beginner to intermediate, but there are some sections that could be considered expert. Getting into the plains there are rolling dirt roads, some with a moderate or steep grade. Mountain bikers can ride in for more of a challenge or drive a few miles in, where flatter conditions prevail.

This area plays host to the "Black Fly Challenge," a mountain bike race between Inlet and Indian Lake that traverses 40 miles of dirt roads surrounded by 30 miles of marked trails.

Fishing

This area offers some of the best Adirondack waters for native species fishing in the most spectacular remote settings. Although it is suggested that you fish these waters from a lightweight canoe, most can be fished from the shore with careful casting. Moose are often spotted in this area, offering a seldom seen view of an iconic Adirondack denizen.

Maps for the area can be found at the Inlet Information Office. The regular open camping and hiking season is Memorial Day weekend to November snowfall.

Directions

To reach the western gate from Inlet, turn south on Limekiln Road from Route 28 about a mile Northeast of downtown Inlet. Follow the road 2 miles to the entrance gate, which is just past the forest ranger headquarters.

Access to the eastern gate is via the 12-mile long, partially paved Cedar River Road, which begins at Route 28/30 approximately 2 miles west of the village of Indian Lake.

Winter Overview

This area is not recommended for winter access, other than by snowmobile, as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

Mitchell Ponds

This trail has easy, rolling terrain and is a great place for the whole family. The path is on an old roadbed that ends at both trailheads to Mitchell Pond.

Wood Warblers, Woodpeckers, and Ruffed Grouse are seen here often. On the water you might see Great Blue Heron, Merganser, and Common Loons. The last Golden Eagle to nest in New York state was along this trail in 1971.

This trail is a snowmobile trail and mountain bike trail, so it is quite wide. The grade is very mellow, especially from the north. There are limited amounts of elevation change but the trail does climb slightly to Upper Mitchell Pond. A short spur trail on the left will lead to a rise and a picnic table. A bit further a spur trail leads to a dock overlooking Upper Pond. Cross the inlet and another spur trail of roughly 0.8 mile will be on the left to access Lower Mitchell Pond. The views of and out over the ponds are fantastic and a photographer's dream.

Shoreline fishing is all you will have on these two ponds. Lower Pond is very deep, and that's where lake trout are. It is also reported that kokanee are found here, but they're difficult to catch. Most people fish for brown trout.

Location and Distances

The first trail starts at mile marker 5.8 in the Moose River Plains Wild Forest, then loops back out to the second trailhead at Benedict Creek at mile marker 8. The second trailhead is the better of the two. From there it's only 2 miles to Upper Pond.

Most can expect the round-trip hike to take up to 4 hours, less for experienced hikers. Most mountain bikers should be able to complete the round trip in less than 2 hours.

Winter Overview

This trail is not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains Wild Forest is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

These two ponds are located on a foot trail that's off the right side of Rondaxe Road across from the trail to Bald Mountain. Finding good casting room may be difficult, but the amount of fishing done here by visitors is very little and therefore the fish are plentiful. Look for brook trout and pumpkinseed sunfish.

Location

From Inlet, travel south on Route 28 for 6.2 miles, then turn right onto Rondaxe Road. Travel just over 0.1 mile to the trailhead parking on the left. This is the same parking area for Bald Mountain, but the trail is on the opposite side of the road.

Distance

0.8 mile one way to the lake.

This short hike can be done in about an hour.

Winter Overview

The winter parking here is a snowplow turn around and no parking is available.

Enter through the Brown Tract Pond campground. Since there is direct access to the pond, this is a great place to wet a line, swim, canoe, and enjoy a remote Adirondack lake.

Location

2.4 miles west of Raquette Lake on Uncas Road.

Distance

0.1 mile to the lake

Winter Overview

Uncas road is snowmobile access only during the winter, and cars and trucks are prohibited.

A 5.9-mile hike to a lake that's great for fishing for native brook trout and for primitive lean-to camping along the shore.

Back in the 1880s, boats came over by scoot 'n drag cart from Big West Lake on a narrow pathway. This hike requires a good trail map and is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike.

Location

The Moose River Recreation Area. The trail is a 13-mile drive from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. Drive 9.1 miles to the big "T" intersection, then turn right on Otter Brook Road and follow it as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook bridges before reaching the Falls Pond parking area on the left. The access road is a 15 mile per hour car and truck access in summer months only gravel dirt surface.

Distances

5.9 miles to the lake. No mountain bikes allowed.

It can take more than 10 hours to complete this hike. It isn't recommended for inexperienced hikers.

Winter Overview

Not recommended. The Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

Directions

A 5.9-mile hike to a lake that's great for fishing for native brook trout and for primitive lean-to camping along the shore.

Back in the 1880s, boats came over by scoot 'n drag cart from Big West Lake on a narrow pathway. This hike requires a good trail map and is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike.

Location: The Moose River Recreation Area. The trail is a 13-mile drive from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. Drive 9.1 miles to the big "T" intersection, then turn right on Otter Brook Road and follow it as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook bridges before reaching the Falls Pond parking area on the left. The access road is a 15 mile per hour car and truck access in summer months only gravel dirt surface.

Distance: 5.9 miles to the lake. No mountain bikes allowed.

It can take more than 10 hours to complete this hike. It isn't recommended for inexperienced hikers.

Winter Overview: Not recommended. The Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

An 8.1-mile trip into Big West Lake and to the fireplace left behind by Louie Seymour is a benchmark in the hikes of anyone Adirondack. It was here Seymour entertained the "sports" and grew potatoes that were watched over by his collection of garter snakes.

The West Canada Lakes Region was made famous by Seymour as he trapped, fished, and hunted there from 1855 to 1915. Primitive lean-to camping is recommended for an overnight stay. This hike requires a good trail map, which is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike.

Location

The Moose River Recreation Area. The trail starts 13 miles from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. Drive 9.1 miles to the big "T" intersection and turn right. Continue on Otter Brook Road as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook Bridges before reaching the Falls Pond parking area on the left. The parking area accesses the West Canada Lakes Wilderness. The access road is gravel and only open in the summer.

Distance

8.1 miles one way to the lake

It can take well over 10 hours to do this hike. It isn't recommended for beginners.

Winter Overview

Not recommended. Access at the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

This is a great place for the whole family with easy, rolling terrain. The trail is an old road that ends at Beaver Lake in 2.1 miles. This is the site of the old Wilcox Hotel and sawmill. Both are long gone, but this is still an easy walk on a wide road with open glens around the lake.

Just across the bridge over the Moose River is the access road and parking area for the trailhead. The trail is accessed from the Moose River Recreation Area at a right turn past the Moose River bridge. This is a large river valley setting. During a short 2.5-mile hike through old growth timber, you will see a white pine over 6 feet across on the stump. Black Backed Woodpeckers nest along this trail. Many Wood Warblers live nearby, and at Beaver Lake Common Loons, Osprey, and Great Blue Heron fish.

Trail Description

This trail is used fairly often, but the popularity of this lake hike is not as high as one might think. In a short amount of time, you'll come close to the South Branch of the Moose River, which is a very scenic spot in itself. The trail is mostly flat with only minor rolling hills to contend with. In what seems like a flash, you will be at the shore of Beaver Lake. Quite often a seaplane will land on this lake to deliver hunters and fisherman to this secluded spot in the wild forest.

Location

A 12-mile drive into the Moose River Recreation Area from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. Continue on the main road to the big "T" and turn right. Follow that for 1.3 miles to the Beaver Lake trailhead on the right, just over the Moose River Bridge. The actual trailhead is roughly 0.2 mile down the small side road. Depending on its condition it might be best to park along the main road. The access road has a gravel and dirt surface.

Distance

2.1 miles one way to the lake.

It can take a couple of hours to reach this lake.

Winter Overview

Not recommended. The Moose River Plains Is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

With many good parking spots around the Red River bridge, this trail along the Red River offers miles of access to all types of terrain. The trailhead starts an informal 1.8 mile loop that slips away from the left of the bridge through a replanted evergreen forest in an old sand pit.

The trail is for beginners and has very little elevation change. It winds beneath an old log road canopy of evergreens and hardwoods. When it spills back out on the main road, follow that to the right to return to the trailhead.

Location

The Moose River Recreation Area Primitive Camping Area is a 5-mile drive from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. The gravel and dirt access road has a 15-mile-per-hour speed limit. The trailhead starts 50 yards over the Red River bridge, on the left.

Distance

1.8 miles round trip

It only takes a couple of hours to do this trail.

The first two miles of this trail is on a recently closed dirt road. Then you must ford the Indian River — use caution, this river can be dangerous. A good trail map is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike. The heritage strain brook trout waters here yield great catches to fly fishermen.

Location

Moose River Plains Wild Forest Primitive Camping Area

Drive to the "Big T" in the Moose River Recreation Area, 9.6 miles, then bear right. Travel 1.6 miles to and over the Moose River, and another 4.7 miles to and then over the Otter Brook Bridge. After crossing, bear right again and travel 1.4 miles down to the Little Indian Lake/ Squaw Lake barrier trailhead and parking.

Distances

This is a 12.6-mile drive on a 15-mile-per-hour road in the Moose River Recreation Area. It's 5.7 to 6.9 miles to the lakes. Mountain bikes are not allowed.

Be aware that it can take more than five hours to reach the lakes. It is not recommended for families with small children.

Winter Overview

Not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

The trail is flat and easy, and only 0.75 mile long. It winds through a beech forest and opens up on to a small mountain lake. This lake freezes early, but caution must be taken if you wish to explore the frozen surface. If you take the trail downstream to Limekiln Lake, be sure to hop the rocks back upstream to Fawn Lake. The 50-year-old beaver dam holds back the quiet waters, where dragonflies and large bullfrogs chorus.

Location

Travel north on Route 28 for 0.75 mile, turn right on Limekiln Road, and then turn left in 2 miles onto Parkhurst Road (0.75 mile dead end road). Park at the Sandy tunaround and hike 0.06 mile from the driveway on the left to the trailhead.

Alternate Route: Enter the Moose River Recreation Area and park at mile marker 1. You will see a large, open pull-off on the right. An old Jeep logging road just 60 yards back will take you to the lake in a very short — and usually muddy — walk. This is not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

Distances

It's 0.75 mile to the lake.

It can take about an hour for experienced hikers to complete this hike. It's only about 30 minutes by mountain bike.

Falls Pond

Note: Falls Pond is located in a wilderness area, so mountain bikes are not allowed.

Falls Pond is a fantastic lake to swim in. In the evening you might feel the spirit of French Louie pass you on the trail as he makes his way out to the sugar bush in the Otter Valley. This short hike is perfect for a family, especially during the splendor of fall.

The Falls Pond and West Canada Wilderness Area trailhead has a large parking area leading to some 4,000 acres of pristine forest. Start your hike along an old forest road that quickly becomes an attractive walk through a lush hardwood forest. After 1.5 miles the trail to Falls Pond will come in on the right. An old metal sign on a post and a new wooden sign on a tree mark the trail intersection. From here it's a slight but steady 0.45-mile descent to the shore of Falls Pond.

Location

The parking area is a 13-mile drive in from the Moose River Plains WIld Forest's Limekiln entrance in Inlet. It's 9.1 miles to the big T intersection, then bear right and continue on the Otter Brook Road as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook bridges before reaching the Falls Pond parking area on left. The access road has a gravel and dirt surface.

Distance

2.1 miles one way to the lake.

It can take up to 6 hours to complete this hike.

Winter Overview

Not recommended. Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

Wolf Lake

Start your hike along an old forest road that quickly becomes an attractive walk through a lush hardwood forest. In the fall, during peak foliage, this trail is a real treat to walk.

Along the narrowing trail you will pass by several small wetlands, two well-constructed foot bridges, and a side trail to Falls Pond. Quickly you will come to the Deep Lake Trail on the left after 2.25 miles. Follow that for about 0.1 mile and make a left to Wolf Lake; a right will bring you to Deep Lake. From here the trail seems to get little use or attention but is still easy to follow. A slight climbs and descent will bring you to the shore of the lake.

Location

From the intersection of Route 28 and Limekiln Road in Inlet, follow Limekiln Road. Continue to Moose River Plains Road on the left and follow here. Continue on Moose River Plains Road to Otter Brook Road which will be your second right. Follow here for around 4.4 miles to the West Lake/Falls Pond Trail on the left.

Distance

6.4 miles

It can take 5 hours or more to do this hike.

Deep Lake

Note: This hike requires a good trail map, which is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike. Mountain biking is not allowed here.

Deep Lake is fed by a cold spring. You can imagine men like the old guide Roc Conklin rowing sportsmen along the shore. This is a great area for exploration in the deep wilderness and there is also some great birding along this trail, including Wood Warblers, Hermit Thrush, Wood Pewee, Winter Wren, Barred Owl, Broad-Winged Hawk, and Hairy, Downy, and Pileated Woodpeckers.

Location

From the Limkiln entrance to the Moose River Recreation Area in Inlet, drive 9.1 miles to the "T" intersection, turn right and follow Otter Brook Road as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook bridges before arriving at the Falls Pond parking area on the left. The dirt and gravel access road is only open in the summer.

Distance

It's 3.4 miles to the lake.

It can take about 6 hours to complete this hike.

Winter Overview

Not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

Mukrat Pond

From the end of Indian River Road at the trailhead parking you will pass through boulders blocking the way from vehicular traffic. This is an old road beneath you so the footing is superb.

The grade is quite easy as the trail climbs over the gently rolling hills. At about 1.6 miles from the parking area the Mukrat Trail comes in on the left. The side spur is marked as 0.1 mile, but it is clearly less than that. The trail drops to the shore of the long pond. Mukrat Pond is much more attractive than the name seems to imply — the colors here in fall are quite amazing.

Location

From the intersection of Route 28 and Limekiln Road in Inlet follow Limekiln Road. Continue to Moose River Plains Road on the left and follow here. Continue on Moose River Plains Road to Otter Brook Road which will be your second right. Eventually this turns into Indian River Road which you can follow to the end. These roads through the Moose River Plains are very rough, but can be driven in most cars with some care at slow speeds.

Distance Round Trip

3.4 miles

It can take a few hours to complete this hike.

Fly and Carey Pond Cross-country Ski Trail

This is a very short trail to two small backcountry ponds. These shorelines are quite attractive even in winter. Wildlife viewing has great potential here as well. 

From the parking area, cross county Route 93 to get on the trail. The trail is a bit obscured and lightly used but in good condition. Passing through an open hardwood forest you will quickly come to a short side trail that will lead you down to Fly Pond.

Back on the main trail, you will continue to ski on a mellow trail and pass by Carey Pond on your right and Bottle Mountain to your left. There is a slight hill in this area that you pass up and over. A short distance past the Carey Pond Trail lays an old road, which has been converted into a snowmobile trail. Ski along this old road for a very short distance to the right and this will bring you to the north side of the pond. Return via the same route.

Location

From the intersection of Uncas Road and Route 28 in Inlet follow Route 28 toward Old Forge. Continue for around 5-miles to County Route 93 on the right. Drive down this road for 0.25 miles to the Bald Mountain Trailhead on the left, park here, the Fly Pond Trail is on the right.

Elevation Gain/Loss

-140 Feet

Distance

1.2 miles

It usually takes a couple of hours to complete this hike.

Additional Important Information

Skiing over a frozen body of water is a cross-country skiing past time; it can access you to areas not seen by most in the summer. With that being said it is a dangerous activity to cross frozen water bodies and should be done with care and respect for your environment. Know the ice conditions and be prepared for anything including heavy winds, snow drifts, whiteouts, slushy conditions, and thin ice.

Sis and Bubb Lakes

Access to these ponds can be made quickly from Route 28 just outside of Eagle Bay. Several campsites along the shore offer the perfect getaway for the angler wanting native brook trout.

This trail gets modest use and the small trailhead parking area can often be full on a busy weekend. From the trailhead you will start climbing moderately up and over the shoulder of Vista Ridge — the Vista Trail will come in on your left. Once you crest the ridge you will start a slow descent to the drainage between Sis and Bubb Lakes. A very nice footbridge spans to the gap. You can continue to the north side of Bubb Lake for additional views; the trail ends at the Moss Lake Loop.

Location: Route 28 about 2 miles southwest of downtown Inlet and 1 mile southwest of Eagle Bay/ Look for the DEC parking area on the right.

Distance: 2.4 miles one way to the lake.

This hike can be done by most in 3 or 4 hours.

Winter Overview: The winter parking here is not plowed and parking on the shoulder of Route 28 is not recommended. The trailhead is also located across from a heavily used snowmobile trail.

Moss Lake Loop

The trail around Moss Lake traverses gently rolling double track hills for mountain bikes and also provides an easy hike. There's also the option of taking the spur trail to Bubb and Sis lakes, which is a nice single track along mostly intermediate terrain with a nice expert section at the end.

Moss Lake is a wonderful spot and a short carry for a canoe. The trailhead is large and doubles as a popular picnic area. Moss Lake was the home to a Girls camp from 1923-1972 — a historical markers tells the story.

Hiking in a counterclockwise direction, the trail remains on a flat course as it passes through the Fulton Lakes Wild Forest. The northern part of the trail remains fairly close to the shore, giving ample opportunity to approach the lake. There are nine primitive camping sites along the shore.

The trail remains on the old forest road and eventually moves away from the lake. The path leading to Sis and Bubb lakes enters from the right.

Directions

From the intersection of Route 28 and Big Moose Road in Eagle Bay, 1 mile south of downtown Inlet, follow Big Moose Road for just over 2.25 miles to the Moss Lake trailhead and parking area on the left.

Distance

It's a 2.5 mile loop to Moss Lake and back.

Most hikers should it expect it to take a little over 2 hours to complete the entire hike. Mountain bikers can complete it in half that time.

Winter Overview

This trail is excellent for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. The parking area is plowed and receives regular use by visitors.

Cascade Lake Loop and Falls

The trail starts out following the course of Big Moose Road and quickly comes to the old trail, which started slightly further back up the road. The trail never climbs or descends too much, but when it does it's at a gentle pace. At roughly 1.1 mile there's a split in the trail — this is the Cascade Pond Loop. Either direction works fine, but people tend to hike it in a counter-clockwise direction.

The southern portion of the loop never approaches the lake very closely, but it is close enough to see through the trees. The outlet on the far end houses a wonderful waterfall, which is worth the trip in itself. Past the waterfall it is very wet, but this has been flagged for a reroute and hopefully a couple of small bridges.

Once past the wet area, the trail climbs to higher ground. The trail does approach the water's edge on a few occasions on the northern trail, which leads through the site of an old Girl Scout Camp. The trail eventually comes back to the intersection at 1.1 miles from the trailhead.

Cascade offers four or five well-hidden locations to fish trophy bass along the footpath surrounding the shore. With a bit of determination you can find the perfect spot for bobber and worm casting. It also offers bird watching of species that include Wood Warblers, Hermit Thrush, Wood Pewee, Winter Wren, Barred Owl, Broad-Winged Hawk, and Hairy, Downy and Pileated Woodpeckers.

Note: Mountain biking is not allowed here.

Location: From the intersection of Route 28 and Big Moose Road in Eagle Bay, follow Big Moose Road. Continue for 1.3 miles to the Cascade Lake Trailhead on the right.

Distance: A 3.4 mile round-trip loop.

It can take up to five hours to complete this hike.

Winter Overview: The winter parking here is snowplowed for 12 cars and offers a great place for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Even though it is not professionally groomed there seems to be enough use that the trail is tracked in on most days.