The Sargent Ponds trails offer an excellent opportunity to bike through the woods on well marked, fairly level, paths. Separate trails lead to Upper and Lower Sargent ponds, with a connecting trail between them. There are a few steep grades along the 3.5-mile loop.

It is possible to make the Upper and Lower ponds into a loop by way of the trail via Middle Pond. Use the marked snowmobile trail north of the ponds to make this connection.

Fishing for brook trout in Sargent Ponds has been a favorite for 100 years. Primitive lean-to camping is available for those who wish carry a pack boat. These lean-to see a lot of visitors.

Distance

This is a 3.5 mile loop.

Location

Start at the three corners in Long Lake and drive south toward Blue Mountain Lake on Route 28N/30. North Point Road will be on the right in 3 miles — drive down North Point Road. There will be a fork in the road a few miles in; right leads to Forked Lake Campsite, left to the trailhead. The trailhead is marked with state DEC signs on the left side of the road at 4.6 miles.

It can take up to 5 hours to hike this loop at a leisurely pace.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as this is a snowmobile trail in the winter.

This trail starts on North Rondaxe Road as a beginner trail, then turns to intermediate past Safford Pond. The trip connects Big Moose Lake and Lake Rondaxe. A 16.5-mile loop is possible using Rondaxe Road, Route 28, and Big Moose Road.

Location

From Inlet, take Route 28 south toward Old Forge. Turn right on Rondaxe, then right on North Rondaxe Road. The parking area and trailhead are on the left.

Distance

It's 4.5 miles one way.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as this is a snowmobile trail in the winter.

The area around this bridge is the favorite spot of fishermen. Off the beaten path, there are many open sandy areas for casting.

This is the North Branch of the Moose River. Bridges and crossings along the bike trails off of North Street in Old Forge offer hundreds of spots for calm water paddling and fishing. Clear water and sandy weed beds are home to a variety of species.

By parking a second car at North Street Bridge, 1 mile from Route 28 near the red, white, and blue bridge in Old Forge, a one-way paddle is possible. And avoids the portage around Indian Rapids. This is a excellent spot for the start of a Mountain Bike Journey on the Town Of Webb Trail System, which gives access to 100 miles of loops. This is also a great location for a long distance family bird hike along the old gravel roadways of the Old Forge Trail System.

Distance

Direct access for Parking / Fishing and Canoe Put in.

24 Miles Round Trip Paddle to Old Forge and Back.

Location

Take Route 28 south from Inlet for 6.5 miles and turn right on Rondaxe Road. Parking is a sandy pull off on the left just before the bridge.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as this is a snowmobile trail in the winter.

 

Access to Red River is located 5 miles into the Moose River Plains Wild Forest, off of Limekiln Road.

This slow moving, "perfect Adirondack wilderness," river is full of native fish at its southern end and has easy fishing locations for any angler. The shoreline around the bridge is open and sandy, but not home to more than chubs for fishing.

The rest of the river can be fished with waders or by using deer trails to get to the shoreline edges. Small pack boats can also navigate it when the water is up. Many beaver dams and thousands of untouched pools await your visit.

Location

It's 5-mile drive into the Moose River Plains Wild Forest from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. The access road has a rough, gravel surface.

Distance

It's up to 10 miles round trip on the river when the water level is high.

Red River contains a lot of beaver dams that have to be maneuvered over, and the channel is only about two boats wide. This is not a leisurely paddle, and navigating Red River with small children is not recommended.

Winter Overview

Red River is not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains Wild Forest is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

Directions

This "pull off and fish by the roadside" pond has been the favorite for parents teaching their children to fish, and it also yields some very nice fish for the adults. It's a great spot for a short paddle with a car top boat, and has an amazing amount of flowering water plants.

Location

Travel 6 miles from downtown Inlet on South Shore Road and you will find direct access to this gravel pull off.

Distance

Direct access

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended as this pond typically does not completely freeze over, so there are a lot of dangerous, open areas.

Known as the Great Eight Lakes, this trail is easy to intermediate and is only 3 miles to Queer Lake, then 2.3 miles to Chain Ponds. Even longer loops to the other loops are possible.

  • Mays Pond, 4.5 miles
  • Chub Lake, 5.1 miles
  • Constable Pond, 5.4 miles
  • Pigeon Lake, 8.7 miles
  • Otter Pond, 12.4 miles

Most people do the 3-mile hike from the trailhead to Queer Lake for an easily accessible yet remote lean-to camping experience. A nice lean-to is ready for use on the point just 500 yards up the trail and to the left when you come to the lake.

Each lake has different fishing qualities, with Queer Lake known for its native lake trout. While birding around these lakes you can look and listen for Olive-Sided and Yellow- Bellied Flycatchers, Nashville Warblers, Northern Parula and Palm Warblers, and Lincoln's, Swamp, and White-Throated Sparrows.(

Location

In Eagle Bay, turn onto Big Moose Road from Route 28. The parking area is on the right, 5.3 miles from Route 28.

Distance

It's 3 miles one way to Queer Lake. This is a Wilderness Area, so no mountain bikes are allowed.

It can take more than 5 hours to hike to Queer Lake and back, although fit hikers can probably do it in less time.

Winter Overview

Winter access here is great for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. The parking area is regularly plowed and the trail has very few elevation changes.

The Moose River Plains Wild Forest is part of the 80,000 acre Moose River Plains Complex, a collection of public lands crossed by more than 40 miles of old dirt logging roads. There are 130 miles of marked trails within the complex, as well as more than 100 primitive roadside tent sites, 65 waterbodies, 100 miles of streams, and a fire tower on Wakely Mountain.

The dirt roads running throughout the complex are rough in places. In the Moose River Plains Wild Forest, Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road is a 23-mile long seasonal access road that's often used by vehicles and mountain bikers. Some of the pitches are steep, but the area is fairly flat by Adirondack standards. You must register at either the Limekiln or Cedar River Road gate, but access is free.

Mountain biking

Welcome to mountain biking heaven. The difficulty level for mountain biking in this area mostly ranges from beginner to intermediate, but there are some sections that could be considered expert. Getting into the plains there are rolling dirt roads, some with a moderate or steep grade. Mountain bikers can ride in for more of a challenge or drive a few miles in, where flatter conditions prevail.

This area plays host to the "Black Fly Challenge," a mountain bike race between Inlet and Indian Lake that traverses 40 miles of dirt roads surrounded by 30 miles of marked trails.

Fishing

This area offers some of the best Adirondack waters for native species fishing in the most spectacular remote settings. Although it is suggested that you fish these waters from a lightweight canoe, most can be fished from the shore with careful casting. Moose are often spotted in this area, offering a seldom seen view of an iconic Adirondack denizen.

Maps for the area can be found at the Inlet Information Office. The regular open camping and hiking season is Memorial Day weekend to November snowfall.

Directions

To reach the western gate from Inlet, turn south on Limekiln Road from Route 28 about a mile Northeast of downtown Inlet. Follow the road 2 miles to the entrance gate, which is just past the forest ranger headquarters.

Access to the eastern gate is via the 12-mile long, partially paved Cedar River Road, which begins at Route 28/30 approximately 2 miles west of the village of Indian Lake.

Winter Overview

This area is not recommended for winter access, other than by snowmobile, as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

Mitchell Ponds

This trail has easy, rolling terrain and is a great place for the whole family. The path is on an old roadbed that ends at both trailheads to Mitchell Pond.

Wood Warblers, Woodpeckers, and Ruffed Grouse are seen here often. On the water you might see Great Blue Heron, Merganser, and Common Loons. The last Golden Eagle to nest in New York state was along this trail in 1971.

This trail is a snowmobile trail and mountain bike trail, so it is quite wide. The grade is very mellow, especially from the north. There are limited amounts of elevation change but the trail does climb slightly to Upper Mitchell Pond. A short spur trail on the left will lead to a rise and a picnic table. A bit further a spur trail leads to a dock overlooking Upper Pond. Cross the inlet and another spur trail of roughly 0.8 mile will be on the left to access Lower Mitchell Pond. The views of and out over the ponds are fantastic and a photographer's dream.

Shoreline fishing is all you will have on these two ponds. Lower Pond is very deep, and that's where lake trout are. It is also reported that kokanee are found here, but they're difficult to catch. Most people fish for brown trout.

Location and Distances

The first trail starts at mile marker 5.8 in the Moose River Plains Wild Forest, then loops back out to the second trailhead at Benedict Creek at mile marker 8. The second trailhead is the better of the two. From there it's only 2 miles to Upper Pond.

Most can expect the round-trip hike to take up to 4 hours, less for experienced hikers. Most mountain bikers should be able to complete the round trip in less than 2 hours.

Winter Overview

This trail is not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains Wild Forest is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

The trail to Lower Sargent Pond is marked with both snowmobile and hiking trail markers. It goes primarily through hardwood stands with occasional stands of softwoods.

As you near Grass Pond, the trail turns marshy and veers to the west around beaver flows. There is a lean-to on Lower Sargent Pond, which is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Location

Off of North Lake Road just south of the Village of Long Lake. Drive 5.2 miles to the trailhead on the left.

Distance

It's an easy 1-mile hike to Lower Sargent Pond.

Expect this hike to take 2 hours round-trip, less for more experienced hikers.

Winter Overview

This trail is not recommended for winter access.

Limekiln Lake Campground is run by the DEC. You can fish from any of the lakefront sites as well as from the public boat launch. There's splake and brown trout for the advanced fisherman, and sunfish, bullhead, and perch for the smaller anglers.

The campground has 3 miles of paved roadway that is great for road biking in the spring, summer, and fall. In the winter the town of Inlet grooms a 3 mile loop for cross-country skiing. These are double and single-track trails that connect to Fern Park. Be aware that there may be a few wet sections that have to be walked.

Location

From downtown Inlet, travel 0.75 mile northeast on Route 28 and turn right on Limekiln Lake Road. Drive 2 miles to the campsite entrance on the right.

Distance

An easy 3-mile loop.

It can take up to 3 hours to walk the campground loop.

Winter Overview

The town of Inlet highway department plows a four-car parking area at the beginning of the campsite road. Cross–country ski trails are groomed for both skate and traditional skiing. Always check ice thickness before walking on local lakes. The lake sees a small amount of snowmobile travel during the winter. Ice fisherman enjoy good action with splake and perch.

Located on the south side of Route 28, the Green Bridge and Lock and Dam picnic area offers about 20 nice fishing locations for fishermen and women of all ages.

The shores of this large picnic area offer some weed beds for fishing rainbow and brook trout, perch, and sunfish. There is a cartop only boat launch at this location.

Location

Take a left in Thendara on Route 28 at the Steakhouse Restaurant, travel 0.2 mile and turn left onto Green Bridge road in Thendara.

It's an easy, 0.3-mile walk to the dam.

Winter Overview: Always check ice thickness before walking on local lakes. Fourth Lake sees a large amount of snowmobile traffic during the winter. Ice fishermen enjoy good action with tigermuskie, perch, and lake trout. Plowing at the access is limited.

The shores of this large picnic area offer some feed weed beds for fishing northern pike, tigermuskie, perch, and sunfish. There is a cartop only boat launch at this location.

Location: Drive 7.3 miles from downtown Inlet on South Shore Road and turn onto Petrie Road. Follow that for 0.3 mile to the state DEC cartop boat access and picnic area.

These two ponds are located on a foot trail that's off the right side of Rondaxe Road across from the trail to Bald Mountain. Finding good casting room may be difficult, but the amount of fishing done here by visitors is very little and therefore the fish are plentiful. Look for brook trout and pumpkinseed sunfish.

Location

From Inlet, travel south on Route 28 for 6.2 miles, then turn right onto Rondaxe Road. Travel just over 0.1 mile to the trailhead parking on the left. This is the same parking area for Bald Mountain, but the trail is on the opposite side of the road.

Distance

0.8 mile one way to the lake.

This short hike can be done in about an hour.

Winter Overview

The winter parking here is a snowplow turn around and no parking is available.

Explore this turn-of-the-century transportation route by foot or by mountain bike. This loop includes flat dirt roads that are appropriate for beginners, as well as more challenging off-road trails for the advanced rider. Ride a section of the trails or do a 14 or 22-mile loop.

Location

The trail begins at the Eighth Lake Campground, 5.2 miles northeast of downtown Inlet.

Distance

7 to 11 miles one way to the lake.

This long trek can take more than 12 hours to do by foot.

Winter Overview

The winter parking here is not plowed and parking on the shoulder of Route 28 is not recommended.

Enter through the Brown Tract Pond campground. Since there is direct access to the pond, this is a great place to wet a line, swim, canoe, and enjoy a remote Adirondack lake.

Location

2.4 miles west of Raquette Lake on Uncas Road.

Distance

0.1 mile to the lake

Winter Overview

Uncas road is snowmobile access only during the winter, and cars and trucks are prohibited.

A 5.9-mile hike to a lake that's great for fishing for native brook trout and for primitive lean-to camping along the shore.

Back in the 1880s, boats came over by scoot 'n drag cart from Big West Lake on a narrow pathway. This hike requires a good trail map and is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike.

Location

The Moose River Recreation Area. The trail is a 13-mile drive from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. Drive 9.1 miles to the big "T" intersection, then turn right on Otter Brook Road and follow it as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook bridges before reaching the Falls Pond parking area on the left. The access road is a 15 mile per hour car and truck access in summer months only gravel dirt surface.

Distances

5.9 miles to the lake. No mountain bikes allowed.

It can take more than 10 hours to complete this hike. It isn't recommended for inexperienced hikers.

Winter Overview

Not recommended. The Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

Directions

A 5.9-mile hike to a lake that's great for fishing for native brook trout and for primitive lean-to camping along the shore.

Back in the 1880s, boats came over by scoot 'n drag cart from Big West Lake on a narrow pathway. This hike requires a good trail map and is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike.

Location: The Moose River Recreation Area. The trail is a 13-mile drive from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. Drive 9.1 miles to the big "T" intersection, then turn right on Otter Brook Road and follow it as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook bridges before reaching the Falls Pond parking area on the left. The access road is a 15 mile per hour car and truck access in summer months only gravel dirt surface.

Distance: 5.9 miles to the lake. No mountain bikes allowed.

It can take more than 10 hours to complete this hike. It isn't recommended for inexperienced hikers.

Winter Overview: Not recommended. The Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

An 8.1-mile trip into Big West Lake and to the fireplace left behind by Louie Seymour is a benchmark in the hikes of anyone Adirondack. It was here Seymour entertained the "sports" and grew potatoes that were watched over by his collection of garter snakes.

The West Canada Lakes Region was made famous by Seymour as he trapped, fished, and hunted there from 1855 to 1915. Primitive lean-to camping is recommended for an overnight stay. This hike requires a good trail map, which is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike.

Location

The Moose River Recreation Area. The trail starts 13 miles from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. Drive 9.1 miles to the big "T" intersection and turn right. Continue on Otter Brook Road as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook Bridges before reaching the Falls Pond parking area on the left. The parking area accesses the West Canada Lakes Wilderness. The access road is gravel and only open in the summer.

Distance

8.1 miles one way to the lake

It can take well over 10 hours to do this hike. It isn't recommended for beginners.

Winter Overview

Not recommended. Access at the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

This is a great place for the whole family with easy, rolling terrain. The trail is an old road that ends at Beaver Lake in 2.1 miles. This is the site of the old Wilcox Hotel and sawmill. Both are long gone, but this is still an easy walk on a wide road with open glens around the lake.

Just across the bridge over the Moose River is the access road and parking area for the trailhead. The trail is accessed from the Moose River Recreation Area at a right turn past the Moose River bridge. This is a large river valley setting. During a short 2.5-mile hike through old growth timber, you will see a white pine over 6 feet across on the stump. Black Backed Woodpeckers nest along this trail. Many Wood Warblers live nearby, and at Beaver Lake Common Loons, Osprey, and Great Blue Heron fish.

Trail Description

This trail is used fairly often, but the popularity of this lake hike is not as high as one might think. In a short amount of time, you'll come close to the South Branch of the Moose River, which is a very scenic spot in itself. The trail is mostly flat with only minor rolling hills to contend with. In what seems like a flash, you will be at the shore of Beaver Lake. Quite often a seaplane will land on this lake to deliver hunters and fisherman to this secluded spot in the wild forest.

Location

A 12-mile drive into the Moose River Recreation Area from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. Continue on the main road to the big "T" and turn right. Follow that for 1.3 miles to the Beaver Lake trailhead on the right, just over the Moose River Bridge. The actual trailhead is roughly 0.2 mile down the small side road. Depending on its condition it might be best to park along the main road. The access road has a gravel and dirt surface.

Distance

2.1 miles one way to the lake.

It can take a couple of hours to reach this lake.

Winter Overview

Not recommended. The Moose River Plains Is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

With many good parking spots around the Red River bridge, this trail along the Red River offers miles of access to all types of terrain. The trailhead starts an informal 1.8 mile loop that slips away from the left of the bridge through a replanted evergreen forest in an old sand pit.

The trail is for beginners and has very little elevation change. It winds beneath an old log road canopy of evergreens and hardwoods. When it spills back out on the main road, follow that to the right to return to the trailhead.

Location

The Moose River Recreation Area Primitive Camping Area is a 5-mile drive from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. The gravel and dirt access road has a 15-mile-per-hour speed limit. The trailhead starts 50 yards over the Red River bridge, on the left.

Distance

1.8 miles round trip

It only takes a couple of hours to do this trail.

The first two miles of this trail is on a recently closed dirt road. Then you must ford the Indian River — use caution, this river can be dangerous. A good trail map is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike. The heritage strain brook trout waters here yield great catches to fly fishermen.

Location

Moose River Plains Wild Forest Primitive Camping Area

Drive to the "Big T" in the Moose River Recreation Area, 9.6 miles, then bear right. Travel 1.6 miles to and over the Moose River, and another 4.7 miles to and then over the Otter Brook Bridge. After crossing, bear right again and travel 1.4 miles down to the Little Indian Lake/ Squaw Lake barrier trailhead and parking.

Distances

This is a 12.6-mile drive on a 15-mile-per-hour road in the Moose River Recreation Area. It's 5.7 to 6.9 miles to the lakes. Mountain bikes are not allowed.

Be aware that it can take more than five hours to reach the lakes. It is not recommended for families with small children.

Winter Overview

Not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

The trail is flat and easy, and only 0.75 mile long. It winds through a beech forest and opens up on to a small mountain lake. This lake freezes early, but caution must be taken if you wish to explore the frozen surface. If you take the trail downstream to Limekiln Lake, be sure to hop the rocks back upstream to Fawn Lake. The 50-year-old beaver dam holds back the quiet waters, where dragonflies and large bullfrogs chorus.

Location

Travel north on Route 28 for 0.75 mile, turn right on Limekiln Road, and then turn left in 2 miles onto Parkhurst Road (0.75 mile dead end road). Park at the Sandy tunaround and hike 0.06 mile from the driveway on the left to the trailhead.

Alternate Route: Enter the Moose River Recreation Area and park at mile marker 1. You will see a large, open pull-off on the right. An old Jeep logging road just 60 yards back will take you to the lake in a very short — and usually muddy — walk. This is not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

Distances

It's 0.75 mile to the lake.

It can take about an hour for experienced hikers to complete this hike. It's only about 30 minutes by mountain bike.

This is a New York state DEC campground where there is access to both Seventh and Eighth lakes and nice hiking and nature trails nearby.

Loons and Mergansers are common on both lakes, and Gray Jays, Boreal Chickadees, Olive-Sided and Yellow-Bellied Fly Catchers, Rusty Blackbird, Solitary Vireo, Parula, Yellow Rumped, Palm, Nashville and Common Yellow Throat Warblers, Sawhet and Short-Eared Owls, Red Breasted Nuthatch, and White Throated, Swamp, and Lincoln Sparrows also in the area.

Location

From Downtown Inlet, drive 5 miles to the Eighth Lake State Campground on the left. A day use or camping fee will be required.

Distances

There are 1.5 miles of paved park roadway that are easy for a stroller or a road bicycle. It can take a couple of hours to do the entire loop on foot, and less than an hour by bike.

Winter Overview

In the winter, the trail is snowmobile-access only and not recommended for ski or snowshoe travel, plus the campground entrance is a snowplow turn around, so parking is not recommended.

 

This is a New York State DEC campground. The fishing from the lake front sites in Eighth Lake Campground has always been good, and there's even a small boat launch where one could troll for lake trout. This spot allows access to both Seventh and Eighth lakes. There's also a nice, short fishing dock that extends into Seventh Lake, where fishing in the evenings is better. 

Location: From Downtown Inlet, drive 5 miles to the Eighth Lake State Campground on the left. A day use or camping fee will be required.

Jessup River on Jessup River Road

Directions to Access Points

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 30 toward Speculator. Continue on Route 30 for 5.25 miles past the access for Mason Lake and locate the Jessup River Road on the right. Follow Jessup River Roar for just over 3.5 miles to the bridge over the river.

Shoreline Fishing

The river in this area is quite shallow and easy to walk and wade so it makes for excellent shore fishing and fly fishing. The river bottom is mainly sand making for a great place to work yourself well up and down stream of the roadside. Look for deep pools where the trout like to hang out.

Boat access

No boat access

Fish Species Types

Brook Trout, Brown Trout, Landlocked Salmon

Special Regulations

Always Follow State fishing regulations and be sure to pick up a NYS Freshwater Fishing Guide at your local outfitters or regional NYSDEC office.

Mud Pond - Indian Lake | Fishing

Directions to Access Points

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 28 toward North Hudson for around 1.4 miles to Chain Lake Road on the left and drive Chain Lake Road to the gate at the end. The distance to the gate depends on the time of year you visit. There is a gate that is often closed for mud season, but during non-mud season you can get through to another gate about a mile further in.

Shoreline Fishing

This access and pond is now on state land and is open to the public. Shore fishing is the only option for this backcountry pond. Unfortunately with that there is also limited access. However when open water can be reached from the shore it is said that the brook trout fishing is pretty good. This might be a nice stop off place to try with the nearly Clear Pond or on the way to the Cedar River.

Boat access

No boat access

Fish Species Types

Brook Trout

Special Regulations

Always Follow State fishing regulations and be sure to pick up a NYS Freshwater Fishing Guide at your local outfitters or regional NYSDEC office.

Clear Pond | Fishing

Directions to Access Points

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 28 toward North Hudson for around 1.4 miles to Chain Lake Road on the left and drive Chain Lake Road to the gate at the end. The distance to the gate depends on the time of year you visit. There is a gate that is often closed for mud season, but during non-mud season you can get through to another gate about a mile further in.

Shoreline Fishing

This access and pond is now on state land and is open to the public. Shore fishing is the only option for this backcountry pond, but there are plenty of spots along the shore as well as rock outcroppings near the outlet on the south side to use to access the open water. To reach the pond you will need to hike roughly 2.6 miles from the outer gate.

Boat access

No boat access

Fish Species Types

Brook Trout

Special Regulations

Always Follow State fishing regulations and be sure to pick up a NYS Freshwater Fishing Guide at your local outfitters or regional NYSDEC office.

Cedar River from Gooley Club Road

Directions to Access Points

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 28 toward North Hudson for around 1.4 miles to Chain Lake Road on the left and drive Chain Lake Road to the gate at the end. The distance to the gate depends on the time of year you visit. There is a gate that is often closed for mud season, but during non-mud season you can get through to another gate about a mile further in.

Shoreline Fishing

This access is now on state land and is open to the public. Shore fishing is really good for brown trout but preferably fly fishing is best and wading out into the stream seems to be the best opportunity. There is shore fishing along the river however. It is over 3.5 miles to hike along the forest road from the outer gate to reach the river at this location. The access is an easy walk and takes roughly 1.25 hours for most hikers.

Boat access

No boat access

Fish Species Types

Brown Trout

Special Regulations

Always Follow State fishing regulations and be sure to pick up a NYS Freshwater Fishing Guide at your local outfitters or regional NYSDEC office.

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