This trail is a nice, tight single track on fairly level terrain that goes past a couple of lean-tos. The trail runs right along Seventh Lake so there are multiple places to swim.

Location

Take Route 28 north from Inlet and turn left on Seventh Lake Road. 1.5 miles north of downtown Inlet. Continue 0.5 mile, cross the bridge, and continue to the right, then take another quick right after the hairpin turn. Go 1 mile down the gravel road. There is very limited parking here, and the road services many summer cottages.

Distance

It's 4.4 miles one way.

Leisurely hikers can expect it to take 7 hours to complete this intermediate hike.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as there is no parking along the road due to snowplowing.

The Sargent Ponds trails offer an excellent opportunity to bike through the woods on well marked, fairly level, paths. Separate trails lead to Upper and Lower Sargent ponds, with a connecting trail between them. There are a few steep grades along the 3.5-mile loop.

It is possible to make the Upper and Lower ponds into a loop by way of the trail via Middle Pond. Use the marked snowmobile trail north of the ponds to make this connection.

Fishing for brook trout in Sargent Ponds has been a favorite for 100 years. Primitive lean-to camping is available for those who wish carry a pack boat. These lean-to see a lot of visitors.

Distance

This is a 3.5 mile loop.

Location

Start at the three corners in Long Lake and drive south toward Blue Mountain Lake on Route 28N/30. North Point Road will be on the right in 3 miles — drive down North Point Road. There will be a fork in the road a few miles in; right leads to Forked Lake Campsite, left to the trailhead. The trailhead is marked with state DEC signs on the left side of the road at 4.6 miles.

It can take up to 5 hours to hike this loop at a leisurely pace.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as this is a snowmobile trail in the winter.

Follow Sagamore Road from Route 28 and turn right on Uncas Road, which is a dirt road.

At 0.2 mile Uncas Road splits; both forks are gated. Go past the gate on the right. It says private drive, but it is open to bike and foot traffic. After 1.6 miles of mostly uphill travel on the road look for a brown and yellow sign pointing to the right. Veer to the right as the road turns to the left.

Location

From Inlet, take Route 28 north for about 10 miles. Sagamore Road is a right turn off of Route 28.

The best parking is across Route 28 from Sagamore Road, in the Raquette Lake school parking lot.

Distance

It's 2 miles one way from Sagamore Road.

It only takes a couple of hours to complete this trail at a leisurely pace.

Winter Overview

Winter access for fat tire mountain bikes on Sagamore Road is good, but be aware that there is traffic on this road.

Be aware that Sagamore Road can have heavy car traffic as people visit the historic Great Camp Sagamore. Potential traffic aside, the route offers a nice, hard packed gravel surface, which is great for a family to pedal.

Location

From Inlet, take Route 28 north for about 10 miles. Sagamore Road is a right turn off of Route 28.

The best parking is across Route 28 from Sagamore Road, in the Raquette Lake school parking lot.

Distance

It's 4 miles one way to the camp.

This easy bike route can take a few hours at a leisurely pace.

Winter Overview

Winter access for fat tire mountain bikes on Sagamore Road is good, but be aware that there is traffic on this road.

This trail starts on North Rondaxe Road as a beginner trail, then turns to intermediate past Safford Pond. The trip connects Big Moose Lake and Lake Rondaxe. A 16.5-mile loop is possible using Rondaxe Road, Route 28, and Big Moose Road.

Location

From Inlet, take Route 28 south toward Old Forge. Turn right on Rondaxe, then right on North Rondaxe Road. The parking area and trailhead are on the left.

Distance

It's 4.5 miles one way.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as this is a snowmobile trail in the winter.

These trails are mostly easy and flat with some small rolling hills and a few steep climbs. There is easy access directly from Old Forge On North Street or from Eagle Bay on Trail 5, which is located near the laundry mat. You can also ride the train from Thendara to Carter Station, which is in the middle of the trail system.

There are also a few single-track trails that shoot off the main trail system. This trail system provides great family fun.

Location

From Route 28, turn on Rondaxe Road about halfway between Inlet and Old Forge. The parking area is a sandy pull off on the left, just before the bridge.

The trail system can also be accessed on North Street In Old Forge. Park at the Hildenbrant Pavilion, which is 0.5 mile down North Street, on the left.

The old railroad track starts across the road from the Browns Tract beach access on Uncas Road. There are two options from this point — stay on the old Uncas Road and go over Fox Mountain or to take the old railroad bed into the village of Raquette Lake. The railroad is an easier route into Raquette Lake, which is reached in 2.5 miles.

The end of the old railroad becomes Dillon Road. Once you pass the small library to your right, be on the lookout for a foundation on the left. After the foundation, turn right on the pavement and curve past the Raquette Lake Supply building. If you go left you'll start the climb back up Fox Mountain on Uncas road, back to the starting point.

Location

Look for the dirt road that's on Uncas Road, across the road from the Browns Tract Pond beach access. This is the old railroad.

Distance

It's 2.5 miles one way.

It can take more than 4 hours to walk this entire route and back. It takes less time on a mountain bike.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as this is a snowmobile trail in the winter.

The Moose River Plains Wild Forest is part of the 80,000 acre Moose River Plains Complex, a collection of public lands crossed by more than 40 miles of old dirt logging roads. There are 130 miles of marked trails within the complex, as well as more than 100 primitive roadside tent sites, 65 waterbodies, 100 miles of streams, and a fire tower on Wakely Mountain.

The dirt roads running throughout the complex are rough in places. In the Moose River Plains Wild Forest, Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road is a 23-mile long seasonal access road that's often used by vehicles and mountain bikers. Some of the pitches are steep, but the area is fairly flat by Adirondack standards. You must register at either the Limekiln or Cedar River Road gate, but access is free.

Mountain biking

Welcome to mountain biking heaven. The difficulty level for mountain biking in this area mostly ranges from beginner to intermediate, but there are some sections that could be considered expert. Getting into the plains there are rolling dirt roads, some with a moderate or steep grade. Mountain bikers can ride in for more of a challenge or drive a few miles in, where flatter conditions prevail.

This area plays host to the "Black Fly Challenge," a mountain bike race between Inlet and Indian Lake that traverses 40 miles of dirt roads surrounded by 30 miles of marked trails.

Fishing

This area offers some of the best Adirondack waters for native species fishing in the most spectacular remote settings. Although it is suggested that you fish these waters from a lightweight canoe, most can be fished from the shore with careful casting. Moose are often spotted in this area, offering a seldom seen view of an iconic Adirondack denizen.

Maps for the area can be found at the Inlet Information Office. The regular open camping and hiking season is Memorial Day weekend to November snowfall.

Directions

To reach the western gate from Inlet, turn south on Limekiln Road from Route 28 about a mile Northeast of downtown Inlet. Follow the road 2 miles to the entrance gate, which is just past the forest ranger headquarters.

Access to the eastern gate is via the 12-mile long, partially paved Cedar River Road, which begins at Route 28/30 approximately 2 miles west of the village of Indian Lake.

Winter Overview

This area is not recommended for winter access, other than by snowmobile, as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

Mitchell Ponds

This trail has easy, rolling terrain and is a great place for the whole family. The path is on an old roadbed that ends at both trailheads to Mitchell Pond.

Wood Warblers, Woodpeckers, and Ruffed Grouse are seen here often. On the water you might see Great Blue Heron, Merganser, and Common Loons. The last Golden Eagle to nest in New York state was along this trail in 1971.

This trail is a snowmobile trail and mountain bike trail, so it is quite wide. The grade is very mellow, especially from the north. There are limited amounts of elevation change but the trail does climb slightly to Upper Mitchell Pond. A short spur trail on the left will lead to a rise and a picnic table. A bit further a spur trail leads to a dock overlooking Upper Pond. Cross the inlet and another spur trail of roughly 0.8 mile will be on the left to access Lower Mitchell Pond. The views of and out over the ponds are fantastic and a photographer's dream.

Shoreline fishing is all you will have on these two ponds. Lower Pond is very deep, and that's where lake trout are. It is also reported that kokanee are found here, but they're difficult to catch. Most people fish for brown trout.

Location and Distances

The first trail starts at mile marker 5.8 in the Moose River Plains Wild Forest, then loops back out to the second trailhead at Benedict Creek at mile marker 8. The second trailhead is the better of the two. From there it's only 2 miles to Upper Pond.

Most can expect the round-trip hike to take up to 4 hours, less for experienced hikers. Most mountain bikers should be able to complete the round trip in less than 2 hours.

Winter Overview

This trail is not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains Wild Forest is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

The trail to Lower Sargent Pond is marked with both snowmobile and hiking trail markers. It goes primarily through hardwood stands with occasional stands of softwoods.

As you near Grass Pond, the trail turns marshy and veers to the west around beaver flows. There is a lean-to on Lower Sargent Pond, which is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Location

Off of North Lake Road just south of the Village of Long Lake. Drive 5.2 miles to the trailhead on the left.

Distance

It's an easy 1-mile hike to Lower Sargent Pond.

Expect this hike to take 2 hours round-trip, less for more experienced hikers.

Winter Overview

This trail is not recommended for winter access.

This is a 7.6-mile hike along the Otter Brook Basin on an old Jeep road. The mountain to the right is Kitty Cobble. The view across Little Lost Pond includes Little Moose, Manbury, and Round mountains.

Location

The trailhead is a 13-mile drive in from the Limekiln entrance to the Moose River Plains Wild Forest in Inlet. Drive 9.1 miles to the big T intersection, then turn right and continue on Otter Brook Road as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook bridge. Just after the bridge there's a little-used trail on the left. As you hike the area to your right is the West Canada Lakes Wilderness. The gravel access road is only open to vehicles in the summer.

Distance

It's 7.6 miles to Little Lost Pond.

Expect this trail to take more than 10 hours round trip, even for experienced hikers. Mountain bikers can expect up to a 6 hour ride.

Winter Overview

This trail is not recommended for winter use as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

Directions

The Old Dam Nature Trail loop, located near Limekiln Lake campsite #98 on the back side of the leach field, is an easy 1.3 mile hike. You can also access the Third Lake Creek Trail from here.

Beginning at the trailhead, which leads around the outlet of the lake, visitors might see Wood Warblers, woodpeckers, Winter Wrens, and Common and Hooded Mergansers.

Location

From downtown Inlet, travel 0.75 mile northeast on Route 28 and turn right Limekiln Lake Road. Follow that for 2 miles to the campsite entrance on the right. The trail is accessed in the DEC-run Limekiln Lake Campground.

Distance

An easy 1.3 mile loop.

Hikers and mountain bikers should expect to take less than an hour to complete this loop.

Winter Overview

The town of inlet highway department plows a four-car parking area at the beginning of the campsite road. Cross –country ski trails are groomed for both skate and traditional skiing. you can connect with the Old Dam Nature Trail and Third Lake Creek but plan on an all day ski through as the trail is not groomed and snowpack can be deep. The total distance of this loop could be more than 10 miles.

Fern Park

Fern Park is a free, four-season, town of Inlet recreation park located on Loomis Road, just off of South Shore Road.

In summer, this park offers a playground, ball field, indoor and outdoor basketball courts, public restrooms, and a network of more than 20 miles of loop hiking and mountain biking trails that range from easy to difficult. There are single and double track trails for riders and hikers to follows, with lots of elevation changes.

Winter brings groomed sledding, cross-country skiing, and snowshoeing outside and an indoor skating rink, public restrooms, and warming rooms in the pavilion. There is 1.2 miles of lit and groomed trails in the winter for nighttime ski and snowshoe excursions. Detailed maps are available at the trailhead and at the Inlet Information Office, or call (866) GO-INLET or visit inletny.com for more information.

Location

From Route 28 in downtown Inlet, turn onto South Shore Road. Travel 0.2 mile, take a left onto Loomis Road, and continue for about 100 yards to the parking area.

Distances

There are 20 miles of looping trails ranging from easy to expert. Fern Park is single-track mountain biking paradise.

It's easy to make any number of loops on Fern Park's trails. Families can do short hikes, but there are plenty of longer options for those seeking a challenge.

Winter Overview

Fern Park has free, fully groomed single and double track cross-country ski trails that are also open to snowshoes. There is a warming room and daily plowed parking, plus an ice rink and a children's sledding hill. The park is open until 10 p.m.

These two ponds are located on a foot trail that's off the right side of Rondaxe Road across from the trail to Bald Mountain. Finding good casting room may be difficult, but the amount of fishing done here by visitors is very little and therefore the fish are plentiful. Look for brook trout and pumpkinseed sunfish.

Location

From Inlet, travel south on Route 28 for 6.2 miles, then turn right onto Rondaxe Road. Travel just over 0.1 mile to the trailhead parking on the left. This is the same parking area for Bald Mountain, but the trail is on the opposite side of the road.

Distance

0.8 mile one way to the lake.

This short hike can be done in about an hour.

Winter Overview

The winter parking here is a snowplow turn around and no parking is available.

Explore this turn-of-the-century transportation route by foot or by mountain bike. This loop includes flat dirt roads that are appropriate for beginners, as well as more challenging off-road trails for the advanced rider. Ride a section of the trails or do a 14 or 22-mile loop.

Location

The trail begins at the Eighth Lake Campground, 5.2 miles northeast of downtown Inlet.

Distance

7 to 11 miles one way to the lake.

This long trek can take more than 12 hours to do by foot.

Winter Overview

The winter parking here is not plowed and parking on the shoulder of Route 28 is not recommended.

Enter through the Brown Tract Pond campground. Since there is direct access to the pond, this is a great place to wet a line, swim, canoe, and enjoy a remote Adirondack lake.

Location

2.4 miles west of Raquette Lake on Uncas Road.

Distance

0.1 mile to the lake

Winter Overview

Uncas road is snowmobile access only during the winter, and cars and trucks are prohibited.

Parking is at a small gravel pull off parking area along Route 28 about 2.4 miles southwest of Raquette Lake. The right path leads to the Flow. Left goes 1.7 miles to Eighth Lake canoe carry and lean-to.

There are many interesting birds to watch here, like Black-capped Chickadees, Red-eyed and Blue-headed Vireos, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Red-breasted Nuthatches, and Swainson's Thrush. It's a short 0.6-mile hike down the easy and wide path to the Flow, where a 0.5-mile long raised bridge boardwalk takes paddlers to the water of Browns Tract Flow, which leads out to Raquette Lake.

Location

The small gravel parking area is on Route 28, about 2.4 miles west of Raquette Lake.

Distance

1.1 miles to the lake / Mountain bike: easy

This short hike takes less than 2 hours to complete.

Winter Overview

The winter parking here is not plowed and the shoulder of Route 28 is not recommended.

This is a great place for the whole family with easy, rolling terrain. The trail is an old road that ends at Beaver Lake in 2.1 miles. This is the site of the old Wilcox Hotel and sawmill. Both are long gone, but this is still an easy walk on a wide road with open glens around the lake.

Just across the bridge over the Moose River is the access road and parking area for the trailhead. The trail is accessed from the Moose River Recreation Area at a right turn past the Moose River bridge. This is a large river valley setting. During a short 2.5-mile hike through old growth timber, you will see a white pine over 6 feet across on the stump. Black Backed Woodpeckers nest along this trail. Many Wood Warblers live nearby, and at Beaver Lake Common Loons, Osprey, and Great Blue Heron fish.

Trail Description

This trail is used fairly often, but the popularity of this lake hike is not as high as one might think. In a short amount of time, you'll come close to the South Branch of the Moose River, which is a very scenic spot in itself. The trail is mostly flat with only minor rolling hills to contend with. In what seems like a flash, you will be at the shore of Beaver Lake. Quite often a seaplane will land on this lake to deliver hunters and fisherman to this secluded spot in the wild forest.

Location

A 12-mile drive into the Moose River Recreation Area from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. Continue on the main road to the big "T" and turn right. Follow that for 1.3 miles to the Beaver Lake trailhead on the right, just over the Moose River Bridge. The actual trailhead is roughly 0.2 mile down the small side road. Depending on its condition it might be best to park along the main road. The access road has a gravel and dirt surface.

Distance

2.1 miles one way to the lake.

It can take a couple of hours to reach this lake.

Winter Overview

Not recommended. The Moose River Plains Is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

This trail leads north to Shallow Lake. After 1 mile, it crosses a log bridge over the bog. This is a wonderful area to see Black-backed and Northern Three Toed Woodpeckers, Gray Jays, Boreal Chickadees, Olive-Sided and Yellow Bellied Fly Catchers, White Throated, Swamp and Lincoln Sparrows, Rusty Blackbird, Solitary Vireo, Parula, Yellow Rumped, Palm, Nashville and Common Yellow Throat Warblers, Sawhet and Short-Eared Owls, and Red Breasted Nuthatch.

Location

This is a birding area located off Uncas Road, near the village of Raquette Lake. The trail is on the right when leaving the village.

Distances

3 mile, round-trip loop.

This hike can take more than three hours to clompete. It's moderately difficult for mountain biking.

Winter Overview

Recommended for snowshoe access only.

With many good parking spots around the Red River bridge, this trail along the Red River offers miles of access to all types of terrain. The trailhead starts an informal 1.8 mile loop that slips away from the left of the bridge through a replanted evergreen forest in an old sand pit.

The trail is for beginners and has very little elevation change. It winds beneath an old log road canopy of evergreens and hardwoods. When it spills back out on the main road, follow that to the right to return to the trailhead.

Location

The Moose River Recreation Area Primitive Camping Area is a 5-mile drive from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. The gravel and dirt access road has a 15-mile-per-hour speed limit. The trailhead starts 50 yards over the Red River bridge, on the left.

Distance

1.8 miles round trip

It only takes a couple of hours to do this trail.

The trail on the right is flagged at the beginning with yellow and red tape. Keep a lookout for this junction as it is easily missed. The road is rocky as you approach and the right turn off is sharp. This trail is fairly flat with gentle, rolling hills.

Location

Turn right off the road from Sagamore and there will be a gate that can be ridden around on the left. Follow this rocky road for a while and come to a bridge. Climb up a slight incline away from the bridge, and look for a trail sign on the left side of the road pointing to the right.

Distance

1.9 miles from the Rondaxe parking area trailhead to the summit.

It can take about 3 hours to do this hike, and about half that on a mountain bike.

Winter Overview

Recommended for snowshoe access only. Parking is not authorized here in the winter.

The trail is flat and easy, and only 0.75 mile long. It winds through a beech forest and opens up on to a small mountain lake. This lake freezes early, but caution must be taken if you wish to explore the frozen surface. If you take the trail downstream to Limekiln Lake, be sure to hop the rocks back upstream to Fawn Lake. The 50-year-old beaver dam holds back the quiet waters, where dragonflies and large bullfrogs chorus.

Location

Travel north on Route 28 for 0.75 mile, turn right on Limekiln Road, and then turn left in 2 miles onto Parkhurst Road (0.75 mile dead end road). Park at the Sandy tunaround and hike 0.06 mile from the driveway on the left to the trailhead.

Alternate Route: Enter the Moose River Recreation Area and park at mile marker 1. You will see a large, open pull-off on the right. An old Jeep logging road just 60 yards back will take you to the lake in a very short — and usually muddy — walk. This is not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

Distances

It's 0.75 mile to the lake.

It can take about an hour for experienced hikers to complete this hike. It's only about 30 minutes by mountain bike.

Sis and Bubb Lakes

Access to these ponds can be made quickly from Route 28 just outside of Eagle Bay. Several campsites along the shore offer the perfect getaway for the angler wanting native brook trout.

This trail gets modest use and the small trailhead parking area can often be full on a busy weekend. From the trailhead you will start climbing moderately up and over the shoulder of Vista Ridge — the Vista Trail will come in on your left. Once you crest the ridge you will start a slow descent to the drainage between Sis and Bubb Lakes. A very nice footbridge spans to the gap. You can continue to the north side of Bubb Lake for additional views; the trail ends at the Moss Lake Loop.

Location: Route 28 about 2 miles southwest of downtown Inlet and 1 mile southwest of Eagle Bay/ Look for the DEC parking area on the right.

Distance: 2.4 miles one way to the lake.

This hike can be done by most in 3 or 4 hours.

Winter Overview: The winter parking here is not plowed and parking on the shoulder of Route 28 is not recommended. The trailhead is also located across from a heavily used snowmobile trail.

Kunjamuk Cave

This is a very mysterious cave that keeps everyone wondering if it was manmade or not. Check it out and decide for yourself. The cave itself is about 15 feet deep and 8 feet wide with a small window opening near the top.

How to get there

At the intersection of Route 8 and Route 30 in the village of Speculator, look for Elm Lake Road. Follow Elm Lake Road for 1.8 miles to a dirt road on the right. This dirt road leads to Kunjamuk Cave; park off Elm Lake Road.

Trail Description

Many people park near the cave and walk the short spur path to it, but it is much more interesting to walk or mountain bike the road to the cave. The entire walk is just over a mile, which is very easy and perfect for all types of hikers and visitors.

The road continues past the cave and eventually comes to Old Route 8. This secondary trailhead is another excellent option for visiting the cave, and it is equally friendly for the entire family. The distance is similar as well.

Distances

It's 1.2 miles to the cave. Most people can get there in less than a half an hour.

Winter Overview

This would be a nice introductory snowshoe or short cross-country ski destination for the entire family. Be aware that snowmobiles may also be using the trail.

Directions

The cave is 2.2 miles NE of the village of Speculator. From the intersection of Route 30 & 8 in the village of Speculator, head NE on Elm Lake Road for 1.7 miles, and make a right onto the dirt road. Follow for another 0.7 miles to the cave.