The area around this bridge is the favorite spot of fishermen. Off the beaten path, there are many open sandy areas for casting.

This is the North Branch of the Moose River. Bridges and crossings along the bike trails off of North Street in Old Forge offer hundreds of spots for calm water paddling and fishing. Clear water and sandy weed beds are home to a variety of species.

By parking a second car at North Street Bridge, 1 mile from Route 28 near the red, white, and blue bridge in Old Forge, a one-way paddle is possible. And avoids the portage around Indian Rapids. This is a excellent spot for the start of a Mountain Bike Journey on the Town Of Webb Trail System, which gives access to 100 miles of loops. This is also a great location for a long distance family bird hike along the old gravel roadways of the Old Forge Trail System.

Distance

Direct access for Parking / Fishing and Canoe Put in.

24 Miles Round Trip Paddle to Old Forge and Back.

Location

Take Route 28 south from Inlet for 6.5 miles and turn right on Rondaxe Road. Parking is a sandy pull off on the left just before the bridge.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as this is a snowmobile trail in the winter.

 

Directions

This "pull off and fish by the roadside" pond has been the favorite for parents teaching their children to fish, and it also yields some very nice fish for the adults. It's a great spot for a short paddle with a car top boat, and has an amazing amount of flowering water plants.

Location

Travel 6 miles from downtown Inlet on South Shore Road and you will find direct access to this gravel pull off.

Distance

Direct access

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended as this pond typically does not completely freeze over, so there are a lot of dangerous, open areas.

Mitchell Ponds

This trail has easy, rolling terrain and is a great place for the whole family. The path is on an old roadbed that ends at both trailheads to Mitchell Pond.

Wood Warblers, Woodpeckers, and Ruffed Grouse are seen here often. On the water you might see Great Blue Heron, Merganser, and Common Loons. The last Golden Eagle to nest in New York state was along this trail in 1971.

This trail is a snowmobile trail and mountain bike trail, so it is quite wide. The grade is very mellow, especially from the north. There are limited amounts of elevation change but the trail does climb slightly to Upper Mitchell Pond. A short spur trail on the left will lead to a rise and a picnic table. A bit further a spur trail leads to a dock overlooking Upper Pond. Cross the inlet and another spur trail of roughly 0.8 mile will be on the left to access Lower Mitchell Pond. The views of and out over the ponds are fantastic and a photographer's dream.

Shoreline fishing is all you will have on these two ponds. Lower Pond is very deep, and that's where lake trout are. It is also reported that kokanee are found here, but they're difficult to catch. Most people fish for brown trout.

Location and Distances

The first trail starts at mile marker 5.8 in the Moose River Plains Wild Forest, then loops back out to the second trailhead at Benedict Creek at mile marker 8. The second trailhead is the better of the two. From there it's only 2 miles to Upper Pond.

Most can expect the round-trip hike to take up to 4 hours, less for experienced hikers. Most mountain bikers should be able to complete the round trip in less than 2 hours.

Winter Overview

This trail is not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains Wild Forest is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

Limekiln Lake Campground is run by the DEC. You can fish from any of the lakefront sites as well as from the public boat launch. There's splake and brown trout for the advanced fisherman, and sunfish, bullhead, and perch for the smaller anglers.

The campground has 3 miles of paved roadway that is great for road biking in the spring, summer, and fall. In the winter the town of Inlet grooms a 3 mile loop for cross-country skiing. These are double and single-track trails that connect to Fern Park. Be aware that there may be a few wet sections that have to be walked.

Location

From downtown Inlet, travel 0.75 mile northeast on Route 28 and turn right on Limekiln Lake Road. Drive 2 miles to the campsite entrance on the right.

Distance

An easy 3-mile loop.

It can take up to 3 hours to walk the campground loop.

Winter Overview

The town of Inlet highway department plows a four-car parking area at the beginning of the campsite road. Cross–country ski trails are groomed for both skate and traditional skiing. Always check ice thickness before walking on local lakes. The lake sees a small amount of snowmobile travel during the winter. Ice fisherman enjoy good action with splake and perch.

Located on the south side of Route 28, the Green Bridge and Lock and Dam picnic area offers about 20 nice fishing locations for fishermen and women of all ages.

The shores of this large picnic area offer some weed beds for fishing rainbow and brook trout, perch, and sunfish. There is a cartop only boat launch at this location.

Location

Take a left in Thendara on Route 28 at the Steakhouse Restaurant, travel 0.2 mile and turn left onto Green Bridge road in Thendara.

It's an easy, 0.3-mile walk to the dam.

Winter Overview: Always check ice thickness before walking on local lakes. Fourth Lake sees a large amount of snowmobile traffic during the winter. Ice fishermen enjoy good action with tigermuskie, perch, and lake trout. Plowing at the access is limited.

The shores of this large picnic area offer some feed weed beds for fishing northern pike, tigermuskie, perch, and sunfish. There is a cartop only boat launch at this location.

Location: Drive 7.3 miles from downtown Inlet on South Shore Road and turn onto Petrie Road. Follow that for 0.3 mile to the state DEC cartop boat access and picnic area.

Enter through the Brown Tract Pond campground. Since there is direct access to the pond, this is a great place to wet a line, swim, canoe, and enjoy a remote Adirondack lake.

Location

2.4 miles west of Raquette Lake on Uncas Road.

Distance

0.1 mile to the lake

Winter Overview

Uncas road is snowmobile access only during the winter, and cars and trucks are prohibited.

Parking is at a small gravel pull off parking area along Route 28 about 2.4 miles southwest of Raquette Lake. The right path leads to the Flow. Left goes 1.7 miles to Eighth Lake canoe carry and lean-to.

There are many interesting birds to watch here, like Black-capped Chickadees, Red-eyed and Blue-headed Vireos, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Red-breasted Nuthatches, and Swainson's Thrush. It's a short 0.6-mile hike down the easy and wide path to the Flow, where a 0.5-mile long raised bridge boardwalk takes paddlers to the water of Browns Tract Flow, which leads out to Raquette Lake.

Location

The small gravel parking area is on Route 28, about 2.4 miles west of Raquette Lake.

Distance

1.1 miles to the lake / Mountain bike: easy

This short hike takes less than 2 hours to complete.

Winter Overview

The winter parking here is not plowed and the shoulder of Route 28 is not recommended.

This is a New York state DEC campground where there is access to both Seventh and Eighth lakes and nice hiking and nature trails nearby.

Loons and Mergansers are common on both lakes, and Gray Jays, Boreal Chickadees, Olive-Sided and Yellow-Bellied Fly Catchers, Rusty Blackbird, Solitary Vireo, Parula, Yellow Rumped, Palm, Nashville and Common Yellow Throat Warblers, Sawhet and Short-Eared Owls, Red Breasted Nuthatch, and White Throated, Swamp, and Lincoln Sparrows also in the area.

Location

From Downtown Inlet, drive 5 miles to the Eighth Lake State Campground on the left. A day use or camping fee will be required.

Distances

There are 1.5 miles of paved park roadway that are easy for a stroller or a road bicycle. It can take a couple of hours to do the entire loop on foot, and less than an hour by bike.

Winter Overview

In the winter, the trail is snowmobile-access only and not recommended for ski or snowshoe travel, plus the campground entrance is a snowplow turn around, so parking is not recommended.

 

Mud Pond and McRorie Lake

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 28N and Route 30 in Long Lake follow Route 30 toward Tupper Lake. Continue through town and locate Kickerville Road on the right, about 0.6 miles past the bridge over Long Lake. Follow Kickerville Road to the Stone Building at the end. From here a dirt road passes to its right, this leads to the Cedarlands Boy Scout Camp. The road is marked as private but it is open to the public when the scouts are not in session. Drive down this dirt road for around 1-mile to the designated public parking on the left.

Overview

You can use the easement, lakes, and trails between August 23rd and June 23rd. From the parking area return to the road and take a left onto the access road. Walk this for about 0.3 miles to a split in the road and three gates. This is an easy walk, slightly downhill to a slight uphill. Take a left at this main intersection and follow another dirt road to the canoe carry for Mud Pond, which will be on the left. The canoe carry from here is only about 150 feet long and slightly downhill. The launch is nice and flat and shallow.

From Mud Pond is the best way to access McRoarie Lake without adding a long walk along the road. From Mud Pond head north to a narrow passage that connects to the lake. Paddle down this attractive narrow to the take out on the right. This carry is not all that difficult or long. It will lead back to the road you were on early. Take a left and cross the bridge. The carry enters the woods again on the right and goes a few hundred feet to the launch for McRorie Lake.

McRorie Lake is a very large lake with outstanding features. With stellar views of the cliffs of the surrounding mountains you will not be lacking in photographic opportunities. Small islands and bay make up the fantastic features, all worth a bit of exploring.

Type of Launch

Dirt and grass, shallow

Type of Carry

About 0.7 mile carry to Mud Pond along a forest road, cart can be easily used. There is a modest carry from Mud Pond to McRorie Pond which is mainly a foot trail.

Type of Water

Mud Pond can get pretty choppy, as can McRorie Lake. No motorboats allowed, which makes the paddle a peaceful one without the threat of unwanted wakes.

County Line Flow

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 28N and Route 30 in Long Lake follow Route 28N toward Newcomb. Continue for around 8.5 miles to the access site on the left. Look for a DEC sign. Follow this short gravel road down to the parking lot.

Overview

The carry is an easy one as it is all downhill. It is a carry of only around 200' so a cart would not be necessary. The launch area is still very new and just opened by the DEC under a conservation easement with the land owners. The pond is long and somewhat narrow allowing for excellent wind protection, but it can still get a bit choppy during bad weather. Small bays and narrows on the NW end of the pond are a nice place to check out. You can proceed up and down Fishing Brook a very little bit is the conditions are right.

Type of Launch

Grassy

Type of Carry

200 foot carry along a gravel path, downhill

Type of Water

Well sheltered and calm, there may be small motors on the small pond as it is essentially a private pond with public access. There is no access to shore from the pond other than the launch site.

Bullhead Pond |Paddle

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 30 and Route 28 in Indian Lake follow Route 28 for 1.3 mile toward North Hudson to Chain Lake Road on the left. Follow Chain Lake Road for a couple miles to the trailhead on the left.

Overview

The carry is the tough part about this pond, but it hasn't stopped many from doing it, shown by the large boats on the shore. The carry 0.5 miles to the pond but it has great footing and a cart could even be used on this one. While a lighter boat would be best for the carry, it really isn't necessary. The pond has a slight bend to it as you will see from shore as it disappears behind a peninsula. The shape looks a bit like a pistol pointing to the west.

Type of Launch

Sand and rock

Type of Carry

0.5 miles

Type of Water

This body of water is well protected from wind and most bad weather situations. It would be a great pond to use and SUP on as well.

Squaw Lake

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 28 and Limekiln Road in Inlet follow Limekiln Road. Continue to Moose River Plains Road on the left and follow here. Continue on Moose River Plains Road to Otter Brook Road which will be your second right. Eventually this turns into Indian River Road which you can follow to the end. These roads through the Moose River Plains are very rough, but can be driven in most cars with some care at slow speeds.

Overview

This is a wonderful backcountry pond but it will take a short portage to get there. It would be best if you had a lightweight boat because a canoe or kayak cart might not hold up on the rocky trail. From the trailhead you will carry along an old road where a cart would work fine. After about 0.2 miles the spur trail for Squaw Lake comes in on the right, this is where it gets very rocky for a bit and a cart might not do so well. But you could always use the cart in part. There is a nice rock dock that someone built out a ways into the water actually making it easier to get into your boat. Once on the water be sure to check out the rocky shores and rock outcroppings on the lake. Numerous shallow bays add to the beauty of the paddle. Moose are frequent in this area, so you never know.

Type of Launch

Sandy and rocky

Type of Carry

0.6 mile carry along an old road to a foot trail

Type of Water

This is a somewhat large lake but it tends to be well sheltered from heavy winds, bonus is no motorboats will be here.

Upper Sargent Pond Paddle

How to Get There

From the 3-way intersection in the Hamlet of Long Lake follow Route 30/28N toward Blue Mountain Lake. Continue for just over 3-miles to North Point Road on the right. Follow North Point Road for 6.25 miles to the Sargent Ponds Wild Forest Trailhead on the left.

Overview

Upper Sargent Pond is located along a much longer trail but is the easiest to reach while carrying a boat. It is much better to have a light weight canoe or kayak, but a decent cart with wheels could also access you to this quaint pond.

The grassy shore at the launch area is nice for preparing for your paddle and the actual launch is easy to access. To avoid dinging your boat on the rocks along shore wade out a bit, it's very shallow here as well. Small islands and a very long eastern bay add for the romance of the pond and the eastern bay will get you a bit further from the trail. When the water is much higher you can get down the outlet a little ways.

Type of Launch

Sand and stone

Type of Carry

1.4 miles of well graded easy walking, excellent footing, wide trail

Type of Water

This pond is very shallow but even so tends to be quite calm even in foul weather

Outlet Bay on Raquette Lake

How to Get There

From the 3-way intersection in the Hamlet of Long Lake follow Route 30/28N toward Blue Mountain Lake. Continue for just over 3-miles to North Point Road on the right. Follow North Point Road for 8.5 miles to the bridge over the Raquette River, park near here.

Overview

There is parking on both sides of the road. This launch area is not for going downstream into the river; it is far too rocky to paddle. This launch will gain you access to Outlet Bay which is a narrowing on the Raquette Lake where the lake becomes the famous Raquette River. This bay tends to be a very popular fishing destination so it should be of no surprise if fishing boats are around and maybe even kicking up some wakes. Bluff Pont Hill comes down to the east and Bluff Point separates the main body quite well to the south. If you wish to expand your paddle a bit, paddle around Bluff Point and access Boulder Brook. If the conditions are right you can get a ways up the brook before you would need to turn around. This is an attractive and fun small stretch to paddle and if you like birding, you should check it out.

Type of Launch

Sand and stone

Type of Carry

Less than 100 feet

Type of Water

This part of the lake is very calm and well-sheltered, but if you continue out into the lake's main body it tends to get much rougher. Motorboats are allowed.

Lake Durant

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Blue Mountain Lake follow Route 28/30 toward Indian Lake. Continue for a bit over 1.5 miles to a rest area on the left. Cars with low clearance vehicles should park here and walk the secondary rough road directly across the street. The best launces are from along this rough road.

You can also launch from the Lake Durant State Campground a bit further up the road, but a day use fee will be required.

Overview

As mentioned the best launch areas are from the secondary paved road but it is very rough for vehicles with low clearance. If you fear you don't have enough clearance, park across the road in the parking area and walk the few hundred feet to a nice launch area.

Once on the water you will have some excellent scenic vistas and in the fall it is very colorful. The islands that dot the water are excellent spots to take shore for a picnic or a rest stop to stretch your legs. Head west down into the narrows and pass closer to Rock Pond for some additional scenic areas.

Type of Launch

Sand and stone

Type of Carry

Roadside to 0.1 miles depending on where you park

Type of Water

This is a very shallow lake and not well-sheltered. It can get rough under ill weather conditions. Motorboats are allowed.

Barker Pond Paddle

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Blue Mountain Lake follow Route 28/30 for just under 4-miles to the access road for O'Neill Flow on the left. This access road is very rough and should be driven with extreme care. Follow here over Rock River and at the next intersection take a right, there is a sign here for Barker Pond. This next section of road has the potential to be slightly flooded by beaver so you may end up having to walk this. The road dead ends at the three boulders and the trail for Barker Pond.

Overview

Once at the trailhead locate the blue trail that leads to the pond. The trail is very new and a developed as of summer 2015. The trail is also a bit narrow in spots but can be used with a canoe cart if needed. At under 0.2 miles you will come to a primitive campsite on the pond, this is also new. Just past the campsite is a faint herd path that leads to the water. It's a bit tough getting on the water with a boat but once you do it's a nice spot. Loons frequent these waters and apparently so do fisherman.

Type of Launch

Dense forest and narrow path

Type of Carry

It is 0.2 miles from parking lot to pond over a new trail. Trail is a bit narrow and the last 50 feet are along a herdpath to reach the water's edge.

Type of Water

Well sheltered and calm, no motorboats allowed

Sprague Pond

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 28/30 and Cedar River Road in Indian Lake, follow Cedar River Road. Continue for 4.5 miles to the Sprague Pond Trailhead on the right.

Overview

The carry is an easy one and will accommodate a carry if you need or desire to use one. Once on the water this makes for an excellent beginner paddle destinations. Its calm waters and shallow bays are a nice touch to this back-country destination. There are also a couple small islands worth hopping as well, be sure to bring a nice bagged lunch this is a nice spot I am sure you hang around at.

Type of Launch

Sandy

Type of Carry

It is a 0.3 mile carry from Cedar River Road to the edge of the pond. Well graded and flat

Type of Water

Well sheltered and calm, no motorboats allowed in the wilderness area

Rock Lake

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 30 and Route 28 in Indian Lake follow Route 28/30 toward Blue Mountain Lake for 6.0 miles to the trailhead on the right.

Overview

The Lake is a widening of the Rock River which, from the lake, can be paddled up or down stream for a bit. Be aware that Rock River does have rapids and shallow waters in many sections; don't go any further than your ability allows you. The west side of the lake has some outstanding wetlands with superb birding opportunities. On the eastern/northeastern shore be sure to scope out the sand beaches and go for a quick dip in the cooling waters.

Type of Launch

Dirt and a bit rocky

Type of Carry

0.85 mile carry over rough footing and a narrow trail. Best for a light weight canoe or kayak that can be carried.

Type of Water

This is a rather large body of water and not well-sheltered. However it does tend to remain calm under most conditions.

Gilman Lake

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 30 and Route 8 in Speculator follow Route 8/30 toward Wells. Continue just under 1-mile to County Route 11 on the right and turn here. Continue on CR 11 to Gilmantown Road on the left. Follow here for 2.8 miles to the lake's access on the right.

Overview

With a shoreline of just over 2-miles this isn't the largest of lakes in the park, but it sure is one of the most scenic. Located close to a town road for easy access, it still seems to have that back-country feel. Paddle around the lilies and pickerel weeds for some added adventure and birding. Speculator Mountain is approached best via the pond that is if you are up for a neat adventure. Most of the shoreline is private property but the northwest end of the lake is part of the Silver Lake Wilderness.

Type of Launch

Easy, sandy shoreline

Type of Carry

Short, easy carry of less than 100 feet

Type of Water

Well protected by the nearly tall mountains with calm conditions. No motorboats

Utowana Lake

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 follow Route 28 toward Raquette Lake. Continue for over 6-miles to a small dirt pull-off on the right hand side, look for a large boulder set back in the woods near the shore.

Overview

Once on the water you will have a very peaceful paddle. A lean-to rests on the opposite shore offering a secluded spot for lunch or maybe the weekend. You can't paddle very far downstream before the waterway becomes too narrow, but there is a portage around this spot that will get you to better waters to paddle into Raquette Lake. If you head upstream you can easily go into Eagle Lake and then Blue Mountain Lake. The shallow structure of this lake gives it a certain feel unlike many other lakes in the park.

Type of Launch

Grassy, shallow

Type of Carry

200 feet carry down an embankment to a foot path

Type of Water

This is a fairly well sheltered pond where wind is not much of an issue, while motorboats are not forbidden the chances of seeing one are very small, maybe a small outboard fishing motor coming in from Eagle Lake.

7th Lake

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 follow Route 28 through Raquette Lake and locate the state campground on the right, there is a launch here. A second launch is a bit further down Route 28 at a state fishing access site; this will also be on the right.

Overview

If using the state campground launch be aware that a small day-use fee will be required when the campground is open for the season. The state fishing launch is not all that big and tends to fill up very quickly on busy weekends. Once on the lake the paddling is best in the northern bays and narrows toward 8th Lake. Explore the shallows, shores and bay for the best paddling all-in-all. The large open waters are best for longer kayaks and canoes but are aware of motorboats on this large Adirondack lake. Two of the northern shallow bays along Route 28 are nice places to explore and take in a bit of birding; the great blue heron likes to hang out around here.

Type of Launch

Concrete

Type of Carry

Less than 100 feet

Type of Water

This lake is used a bunch by paddlers as well as those using motorboat. It is a very busy lake and rather large as well. Being as large as it is, it is not very well-sheltered when out in the middle, Whitecap conditions to exist when ill weather moves in and seeming windy during midday away from the bays and the shore.

Round Lake

How to Get There

From the 3-way intersection in the Village of Long Lake follow Route 30 toward Tupper Lake. Continue for around 7.5 miles to Sabattis Circle Road on the left. Follow this down to another three-way intersection and take a left. Drive about 0.1 miles to the launch on the right, park here. There is additional parking just back up the road.

Overview

This launch is not direct into Round Lake. This launch will access you to a southern outlet with a fantastic paddle through the narrows. There are several camping locations on the lake for an extended weekend adventure. The wetlands that surround the narrows are excellent birding locations and should be awarded a bit of extra time. With its several small and large bays on all sides and small islands you won't be lacking for areas to explore.

Type of Launch

Dirt with steps

Type of Carry

Less than 100 feet

Type of Water

Can get a bit choppy but otherwise mostly calm. Due to its size it can get whitecaps making paddling much harder.

Rock Pond

How to Get There

From the 3-way intersection in the Village of Long Lake follow Route 30 toward Tupper Lake. Continue for around 7.5 miles to Sabattis Circle Road on the left. Follow this down to another three-way intersection and take a left. Follow this to the Whitney Headquarters on the left, park here.

Overview

Once you paddle south down Little Tupper Lake look for the inlet from Rock Pond on the south side of the lake. There is a very long narrow stream that will access you to Rock Pond. This is possibly the most scenic and interesting paddle opportunities in the region and should not be missed by anyone. Once on Rock Pond there are additional camping opportunities. Hang out here for a couple days and enjoy some serious solitude, listen to the loons and gander about for the local moose. Do not paddle past Rock Pond as it soon becomes private property.

Type of Launch

No launch access from Little Tupper Lake only

Type of Carry

No carry

Type of Water

Calm and pristine

Browns Tract Inlet

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 28 and County Route 2, follow County Route 2 toward the Village of Raquette Lake. Continue for about 0.25 miles to the bridge over the inlet, park safely in this area.
Option 2 would be to launch from the Village of Raquette Lake and paddle Shore of Raquette Lake to access the inlet.

Overview

The launch area from County Route 2, while a bit tricky, can be done on one side of the road or the other. Many paddlers put in at the Village Center near the marina and paddle south along the Shore of Raquette Lake.

Once on the inlet you will be paddling upstream against a gentle current. The oxbows and grassy edges give this snakelike paddle a very interesting feel and outstanding scenic quality. This paddle is an excellent opportunity for aquatic wildflowers as well as birding. The gracefulness of the great blue heron is surely to be seen.

Type of Launch

Roadside

Type of Carry

Less than 100 feet

Type of Water

Raquette Lake can get a bit choppy if you are using it for an approach to the inlet, but the inlet itself is quite calm and a gentle current.

Mason Lake

How to Get There

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 30 toward Speculator. Continue for 16.5 miles to the parking and cartop boat launch for Mason Lake on the right.

Overview

The boat launch is for paddling only. Mason Lake is constructed of many small and narrow bays, be sure to enjoy them all. A narrow southern bay will lead you down toward the outlet where birding is extra special. This is also a great pond for SUP and an introduction to paddling.

Type of Launch

Short steep path

Type of Carry

Roadside

Type of Water

Mason Lake is a small lake and well sheltered from much of the wind.

Moss Lake Loop

The trail around Moss Lake traverses gently rolling double track hills for mountain bikes and also provides an easy hike. There's also the option of taking the spur trail to Bubb and Sis lakes, which is a nice single track along mostly intermediate terrain with a nice expert section at the end.

Moss Lake is a wonderful spot and a short carry for a canoe. The trailhead is large and doubles as a popular picnic area. Moss Lake was the home to a Girls camp from 1923-1972 — a historical markers tells the story.

Hiking in a counterclockwise direction, the trail remains on a flat course as it passes through the Fulton Lakes Wild Forest. The northern part of the trail remains fairly close to the shore, giving ample opportunity to approach the lake. There are nine primitive camping sites along the shore.

The trail remains on the old forest road and eventually moves away from the lake. The path leading to Sis and Bubb lakes enters from the right.

Directions

From the intersection of Route 28 and Big Moose Road in Eagle Bay, 1 mile south of downtown Inlet, follow Big Moose Road for just over 2.25 miles to the Moss Lake trailhead and parking area on the left.

Distance

It's a 2.5 mile loop to Moss Lake and back.

Most hikers should it expect it to take a little over 2 hours to complete the entire hike. Mountain bikers can complete it in half that time.

Winter Overview

This trail is excellent for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. The parking area is plowed and receives regular use by visitors.

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