This trail starts on North Rondaxe Road as a beginner trail, then turns to intermediate past Safford Pond. The trip connects Big Moose Lake and Lake Rondaxe. A 16.5-mile loop is possible using Rondaxe Road, Route 28, and Big Moose Road.

Location

From Inlet, take Route 28 south toward Old Forge. Turn right on Rondaxe, then right on North Rondaxe Road. The parking area and trailhead are on the left.

Distance

It's 4.5 miles one way.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as this is a snowmobile trail in the winter.

Known as the Great Eight Lakes, this trail is easy to intermediate and is only 3 miles to Queer Lake, then 2.3 miles to Chain Ponds. Even longer loops to the other loops are possible.

  • Mays Pond, 4.5 miles
  • Chub Lake, 5.1 miles
  • Constable Pond, 5.4 miles
  • Pigeon Lake, 8.7 miles
  • Otter Pond, 12.4 miles

Most people do the 3-mile hike from the trailhead to Queer Lake for an easily accessible yet remote lean-to camping experience. A nice lean-to is ready for use on the point just 500 yards up the trail and to the left when you come to the lake.

Each lake has different fishing qualities, with Queer Lake known for its native lake trout. While birding around these lakes you can look and listen for Olive-Sided and Yellow- Bellied Flycatchers, Nashville Warblers, Northern Parula and Palm Warblers, and Lincoln's, Swamp, and White-Throated Sparrows.(

Location

In Eagle Bay, turn onto Big Moose Road from Route 28. The parking area is on the right, 5.3 miles from Route 28.

Distance

It's 3 miles one way to Queer Lake. This is a Wilderness Area, so no mountain bikes are allowed.

It can take more than 5 hours to hike to Queer Lake and back, although fit hikers can probably do it in less time.

Winter Overview

Winter access here is great for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. The parking area is regularly plowed and the trail has very few elevation changes.

The old railroad track starts across the road from the Browns Tract beach access on Uncas Road. There are two options from this point — stay on the old Uncas Road and go over Fox Mountain or to take the old railroad bed into the village of Raquette Lake. The railroad is an easier route into Raquette Lake, which is reached in 2.5 miles.

The end of the old railroad becomes Dillon Road. Once you pass the small library to your right, be on the lookout for a foundation on the left. After the foundation, turn right on the pavement and curve past the Raquette Lake Supply building. If you go left you'll start the climb back up Fox Mountain on Uncas road, back to the starting point.

Location

Look for the dirt road that's on Uncas Road, across the road from the Browns Tract Pond beach access. This is the old railroad.

Distance

It's 2.5 miles one way.

It can take more than 4 hours to walk this entire route and back. It takes less time on a mountain bike.

Winter Overview

Winter access is not recommended, as this is a snowmobile trail in the winter.

This is a multi-day trip that should only be undertaken with proper gear and a well-fitted pack. There are lean-tos along the way, but they are available on a first-come, first-served basis only. This trip requires a good trail map, which is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike. Maps are available at the Inlet Information Office.

Location

The trailhead is a 13-mile drive in from the Limekiln entrance to the Moose River Plains Wild Forest in Inlet. Drive 9.1 miles to the big T intersection, then turn right and continue on Otter Brook Road as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook bridges before reaching the Falls Pond parking area on left. The access road has a gravel and dirt surface.

Distance

This is a 34 mile round trip in a Wilderness Area. No mountain bikes are allowed.

Backpackers can expect this trek to take several days to complete. Know your abilities before setting out and always let someone know where you're going before setting out.

Winter Overview

This trail is not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains Wild Forest is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter months.

The Moose River Plains Wild Forest is part of the 80,000 acre Moose River Plains Complex, a collection of public lands crossed by more than 40 miles of old dirt logging roads. There are 130 miles of marked trails within the complex, as well as more than 100 primitive roadside tent sites, 65 waterbodies, 100 miles of streams, and a fire tower on Wakely Mountain.

The dirt roads running throughout the complex are rough in places. In the Moose River Plains Wild Forest, Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road is a 23-mile long seasonal access road that's often used by vehicles and mountain bikers. Some of the pitches are steep, but the area is fairly flat by Adirondack standards. You must register at either the Limekiln or Cedar River Road gate, but access is free.

Mountain biking

Welcome to mountain biking heaven. The difficulty level for mountain biking in this area mostly ranges from beginner to intermediate, but there are some sections that could be considered expert. Getting into the plains there are rolling dirt roads, some with a moderate or steep grade. Mountain bikers can ride in for more of a challenge or drive a few miles in, where flatter conditions prevail.

This area plays host to the "Black Fly Challenge," a mountain bike race between Inlet and Indian Lake that traverses 40 miles of dirt roads surrounded by 30 miles of marked trails.

Fishing

This area offers some of the best Adirondack waters for native species fishing in the most spectacular remote settings. Although it is suggested that you fish these waters from a lightweight canoe, most can be fished from the shore with careful casting. Moose are often spotted in this area, offering a seldom seen view of an iconic Adirondack denizen.

Maps for the area can be found at the Inlet Information Office. The regular open camping and hiking season is Memorial Day weekend to November snowfall.

Directions

To reach the western gate from Inlet, turn south on Limekiln Road from Route 28 about a mile Northeast of downtown Inlet. Follow the road 2 miles to the entrance gate, which is just past the forest ranger headquarters.

Access to the eastern gate is via the 12-mile long, partially paved Cedar River Road, which begins at Route 28/30 approximately 2 miles west of the village of Indian Lake.

Winter Overview

This area is not recommended for winter access, other than by snowmobile, as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

Mitchell Ponds

This trail has easy, rolling terrain and is a great place for the whole family. The path is on an old roadbed that ends at both trailheads to Mitchell Pond.

Wood Warblers, Woodpeckers, and Ruffed Grouse are seen here often. On the water you might see Great Blue Heron, Merganser, and Common Loons. The last Golden Eagle to nest in New York state was along this trail in 1971.

This trail is a snowmobile trail and mountain bike trail, so it is quite wide. The grade is very mellow, especially from the north. There are limited amounts of elevation change but the trail does climb slightly to Upper Mitchell Pond. A short spur trail on the left will lead to a rise and a picnic table. A bit further a spur trail leads to a dock overlooking Upper Pond. Cross the inlet and another spur trail of roughly 0.8 mile will be on the left to access Lower Mitchell Pond. The views of and out over the ponds are fantastic and a photographer's dream.

Shoreline fishing is all you will have on these two ponds. Lower Pond is very deep, and that's where lake trout are. It is also reported that kokanee are found here, but they're difficult to catch. Most people fish for brown trout.

Location and Distances

The first trail starts at mile marker 5.8 in the Moose River Plains Wild Forest, then loops back out to the second trailhead at Benedict Creek at mile marker 8. The second trailhead is the better of the two. From there it's only 2 miles to Upper Pond.

Most can expect the round-trip hike to take up to 4 hours, less for experienced hikers. Most mountain bikers should be able to complete the round trip in less than 2 hours.

Winter Overview

This trail is not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains Wild Forest is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

The trail to Lower Sargent Pond is marked with both snowmobile and hiking trail markers. It goes primarily through hardwood stands with occasional stands of softwoods.

As you near Grass Pond, the trail turns marshy and veers to the west around beaver flows. There is a lean-to on Lower Sargent Pond, which is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Location

Off of North Lake Road just south of the Village of Long Lake. Drive 5.2 miles to the trailhead on the left.

Distance

It's an easy 1-mile hike to Lower Sargent Pond.

Expect this hike to take 2 hours round-trip, less for more experienced hikers.

Winter Overview

This trail is not recommended for winter access.

This is a 7.6-mile hike along the Otter Brook Basin on an old Jeep road. The mountain to the right is Kitty Cobble. The view across Little Lost Pond includes Little Moose, Manbury, and Round mountains.

Location

The trailhead is a 13-mile drive in from the Limekiln entrance to the Moose River Plains Wild Forest in Inlet. Drive 9.1 miles to the big T intersection, then turn right and continue on Otter Brook Road as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook bridge. Just after the bridge there's a little-used trail on the left. As you hike the area to your right is the West Canada Lakes Wilderness. The gravel access road is only open to vehicles in the summer.

Distance

It's 7.6 miles to Little Lost Pond.

Expect this trail to take more than 10 hours round trip, even for experienced hikers. Mountain bikers can expect up to a 6 hour ride.

Winter Overview

This trail is not recommended for winter use as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

Directions

The Old Dam Nature Trail loop, located near Limekiln Lake campsite #98 on the back side of the leach field, is an easy 1.3 mile hike. You can also access the Third Lake Creek Trail from here.

Beginning at the trailhead, which leads around the outlet of the lake, visitors might see Wood Warblers, woodpeckers, Winter Wrens, and Common and Hooded Mergansers.

Location

From downtown Inlet, travel 0.75 mile northeast on Route 28 and turn right Limekiln Lake Road. Follow that for 2 miles to the campsite entrance on the right. The trail is accessed in the DEC-run Limekiln Lake Campground.

Distance

An easy 1.3 mile loop.

Hikers and mountain bikers should expect to take less than an hour to complete this loop.

Winter Overview

The town of inlet highway department plows a four-car parking area at the beginning of the campsite road. Cross –country ski trails are groomed for both skate and traditional skiing. you can connect with the Old Dam Nature Trail and Third Lake Creek but plan on an all day ski through as the trail is not groomed and snowpack can be deep. The total distance of this loop could be more than 10 miles.

Limekiln Lake Campground is run by the DEC. You can fish from any of the lakefront sites as well as from the public boat launch. There's splake and brown trout for the advanced fisherman, and sunfish, bullhead, and perch for the smaller anglers.

The campground has 3 miles of paved roadway that is great for road biking in the spring, summer, and fall. In the winter the town of Inlet grooms a 3 mile loop for cross-country skiing. These are double and single-track trails that connect to Fern Park. Be aware that there may be a few wet sections that have to be walked.

Location

From downtown Inlet, travel 0.75 mile northeast on Route 28 and turn right on Limekiln Lake Road. Drive 2 miles to the campsite entrance on the right.

Distance

An easy 3-mile loop.

It can take up to 3 hours to walk the campground loop.

Winter Overview

The town of Inlet highway department plows a four-car parking area at the beginning of the campsite road. Cross–country ski trails are groomed for both skate and traditional skiing. Always check ice thickness before walking on local lakes. The lake sees a small amount of snowmobile travel during the winter. Ice fisherman enjoy good action with splake and perch.

Located on the south side of Route 28, the Green Bridge and Lock and Dam picnic area offers about 20 nice fishing locations for fishermen and women of all ages.

The shores of this large picnic area offer some weed beds for fishing rainbow and brook trout, perch, and sunfish. There is a cartop only boat launch at this location.

Location

Take a left in Thendara on Route 28 at the Steakhouse Restaurant, travel 0.2 mile and turn left onto Green Bridge road in Thendara.

It's an easy, 0.3-mile walk to the dam.

These two ponds are located on a foot trail that's off the right side of Rondaxe Road across from the trail to Bald Mountain. Finding good casting room may be difficult, but the amount of fishing done here by visitors is very little and therefore the fish are plentiful. Look for brook trout and pumpkinseed sunfish.

Location

From Inlet, travel south on Route 28 for 6.2 miles, then turn right onto Rondaxe Road. Travel just over 0.1 mile to the trailhead parking on the left. This is the same parking area for Bald Mountain, but the trail is on the opposite side of the road.

Distance

0.8 mile one way to the lake.

This short hike can be done in about an hour.

Winter Overview

The winter parking here is a snowplow turn around and no parking is available.

Explore this turn-of-the-century transportation route by foot or by mountain bike. This loop includes flat dirt roads that are appropriate for beginners, as well as more challenging off-road trails for the advanced rider. Ride a section of the trails or do a 14 or 22-mile loop.

Location

The trail begins at the Eighth Lake Campground, 5.2 miles northeast of downtown Inlet.

Distance

7 to 11 miles one way to the lake.

This long trek can take more than 12 hours to do by foot.

Winter Overview

The winter parking here is not plowed and parking on the shoulder of Route 28 is not recommended.

Enter through the Brown Tract Pond campground. Since there is direct access to the pond, this is a great place to wet a line, swim, canoe, and enjoy a remote Adirondack lake.

Location

2.4 miles west of Raquette Lake on Uncas Road.

Distance

0.1 mile to the lake

Winter Overview

Uncas road is snowmobile access only during the winter, and cars and trucks are prohibited.

Parking is at a small gravel pull off parking area along Route 28 about 2.4 miles southwest of Raquette Lake. The right path leads to the Flow. Left goes 1.7 miles to Eighth Lake canoe carry and lean-to.

There are many interesting birds to watch here, like Black-capped Chickadees, Red-eyed and Blue-headed Vireos, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Red-breasted Nuthatches, and Swainson's Thrush. It's a short 0.6-mile hike down the easy and wide path to the Flow, where a 0.5-mile long raised bridge boardwalk takes paddlers to the water of Browns Tract Flow, which leads out to Raquette Lake.

Location

The small gravel parking area is on Route 28, about 2.4 miles west of Raquette Lake.

Distance

1.1 miles to the lake / Mountain bike: easy

This short hike takes less than 2 hours to complete.

Winter Overview

The winter parking here is not plowed and the shoulder of Route 28 is not recommended.

A 5.9-mile hike to a lake that's great for fishing for native brook trout and for primitive lean-to camping along the shore.

Back in the 1880s, boats came over by scoot 'n drag cart from Big West Lake on a narrow pathway. This hike requires a good trail map and is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike.

Location

The Moose River Recreation Area. The trail is a 13-mile drive from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. Drive 9.1 miles to the big "T" intersection, then turn right on Otter Brook Road and follow it as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook bridges before reaching the Falls Pond parking area on the left. The access road is a 15 mile per hour car and truck access in summer months only gravel dirt surface.

Distances

5.9 miles to the lake. No mountain bikes allowed.

It can take more than 10 hours to complete this hike. It isn't recommended for inexperienced hikers.

Winter Overview

Not recommended. The Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

Directions

A 5.9-mile hike to a lake that's great for fishing for native brook trout and for primitive lean-to camping along the shore.

Back in the 1880s, boats came over by scoot 'n drag cart from Big West Lake on a narrow pathway. This hike requires a good trail map and is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike.

Location: The Moose River Recreation Area. The trail is a 13-mile drive from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. Drive 9.1 miles to the big "T" intersection, then turn right on Otter Brook Road and follow it as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook bridges before reaching the Falls Pond parking area on the left. The access road is a 15 mile per hour car and truck access in summer months only gravel dirt surface.

Distance: 5.9 miles to the lake. No mountain bikes allowed.

It can take more than 10 hours to complete this hike. It isn't recommended for inexperienced hikers.

Winter Overview: Not recommended. The Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

An 8.1-mile trip into Big West Lake and to the fireplace left behind by Louie Seymour is a benchmark in the hikes of anyone Adirondack. It was here Seymour entertained the "sports" and grew potatoes that were watched over by his collection of garter snakes.

The West Canada Lakes Region was made famous by Seymour as he trapped, fished, and hunted there from 1855 to 1915. Primitive lean-to camping is recommended for an overnight stay. This hike requires a good trail map, which is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike.

Location

The Moose River Recreation Area. The trail starts 13 miles from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. Drive 9.1 miles to the big "T" intersection and turn right. Continue on Otter Brook Road as it crosses the Moose River and Otter Brook Bridges before reaching the Falls Pond parking area on the left. The parking area accesses the West Canada Lakes Wilderness. The access road is gravel and only open in the summer.

Distance

8.1 miles one way to the lake

It can take well over 10 hours to do this hike. It isn't recommended for beginners.

Winter Overview

Not recommended. Access at the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks during the winter.

With many good parking spots around the Red River bridge, this trail along the Red River offers miles of access to all types of terrain. The trailhead starts an informal 1.8 mile loop that slips away from the left of the bridge through a replanted evergreen forest in an old sand pit.

The trail is for beginners and has very little elevation change. It winds beneath an old log road canopy of evergreens and hardwoods. When it spills back out on the main road, follow that to the right to return to the trailhead.

Location

The Moose River Recreation Area Primitive Camping Area is a 5-mile drive from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. The gravel and dirt access road has a 15-mile-per-hour speed limit. The trailhead starts 50 yards over the Red River bridge, on the left.

Distance

1.8 miles round trip

It only takes a couple of hours to do this trail.

The first two miles of this trail is on a recently closed dirt road. Then you must ford the Indian River — use caution, this river can be dangerous. A good trail map is a must when hiking in such remote locations. Leave word about your trip plans with others before you hike. The heritage strain brook trout waters here yield great catches to fly fishermen.

Location

Moose River Plains Wild Forest Primitive Camping Area

Drive to the "Big T" in the Moose River Recreation Area, 9.6 miles, then bear right. Travel 1.6 miles to and over the Moose River, and another 4.7 miles to and then over the Otter Brook Bridge. After crossing, bear right again and travel 1.4 miles down to the Little Indian Lake/ Squaw Lake barrier trailhead and parking.

Distances

This is a 12.6-mile drive on a 15-mile-per-hour road in the Moose River Recreation Area. It's 5.7 to 6.9 miles to the lakes. Mountain bikes are not allowed.

Be aware that it can take more than five hours to reach the lakes. It is not recommended for families with small children.

Winter Overview

Not recommended for winter access as the Moose River Plains is a snowmobile corridor and not open to cars or trucks in the winter.

This is a New York state DEC campground where there is access to both Seventh and Eighth lakes and nice hiking and nature trails nearby.

Loons and Mergansers are common on both lakes, and Gray Jays, Boreal Chickadees, Olive-Sided and Yellow-Bellied Fly Catchers, Rusty Blackbird, Solitary Vireo, Parula, Yellow Rumped, Palm, Nashville and Common Yellow Throat Warblers, Sawhet and Short-Eared Owls, Red Breasted Nuthatch, and White Throated, Swamp, and Lincoln Sparrows also in the area.

Location

From Downtown Inlet, drive 5 miles to the Eighth Lake State Campground on the left. A day use or camping fee will be required.

Distances

There are 1.5 miles of paved park roadway that are easy for a stroller or a road bicycle. It can take a couple of hours to do the entire loop on foot, and less than an hour by bike.

Winter Overview

In the winter, the trail is snowmobile-access only and not recommended for ski or snowshoe travel, plus the campground entrance is a snowplow turn around, so parking is not recommended.

 

Cascade Pond and Rock Pond

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Blue Mountain Lake follow Route 28/30 toward Indian Lake. Continue for just under 1-mile to where CR 19 comes in sharply on your right and follow here. Go down CR19 for about 0.25 miles to a dirt road on the left with a sign for Cascade Pond. Drive down this road for about 0.1 miles to the trailhead on the right.

Trail Description

The trail is wide and well used, a nice walk in the woods. You will quickly drop down over an old wood bridge before you start an easy hike to Rock Pond which comes in at around 0.6 miles. From there the hike remains easy to moderate but does go over a small hogback in route to the pond. You will come first to the lean-to at 2.6 miles from the trailhead. Continue a bit further for other views of the pond or even further to the Northville/Placid Trail (0.9 miles from lean-to) and Stephens Pond (1.4 miles).

Round Trip Distance

5.2 miles, from outer gate

Approximate Round Trip time

Family with Young Kids

  • 3 to 3.5 hours

Experienced Hiker

  • 2 to 2.5 hours

Inexperienced Hiker

  • 2.5 to 3 hours

Mud Pond - Indian Lake

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 28 toward North Hudson for around 1.4 miles to Chain Lake Road on the left and drive Chain Lake Road to the gate at the end. The distance to the gate depends on the time of year you visit. There is a gate that is often closed for mud season, but during non-mud season you can get through to another gate about a mile further in.

Trail Description

From the gate you will start your hike along the forest road. You will either be by the outer gate during mud season or the inner gate which is by the old hunting club house. This entire hike is along a forest road which is in excellent condition and very easy to walk. You will hike on a slight uphill to the height-of-land which is to the SW of Big Pisgah Mountain before descending gently to Mud Pond. Mud Pond gets pretty close to the trail but you may need to step off the trail a bit to get the best pictures. The trail continues for about another mile or more to the Cedar River.

Round Trip Distance

5.4 miles, from outer gate

Approximate Round Trip time

Family with Young Kids

  • 3 to 3.5 hours

Experienced Hiker

  • 2 to 2.5 hours

Inexperienced Hiker

  • 2.5 to 3 hours

Panther Pond

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 30 toward Speculator. Continue on Route 30 past the Lewey Lake Campground and the Mason Lake parking, both on the right. About 0.25 miles past the Mason Lake parking there is a small pull off near a marshy area of Mason Lake, park here.

Trail Description

This trail is not recommended for some users, not because of difficulty but because of its difficulty to find and follow. This trail is seen on many maps and appears to be unmaintained or completely abandoned making it nearly impossible to locate. Even if you can't locate the trail the pond is easy enough to reach with a bit of navigational background.

In this region is where the trail used to be located and can still be seen with a keen eye. You must carefully cross the main highway and if you cannot follow or stay on the trail the pond is very near through a semi-open mixed forest. The pond itself is lined with wetland making it hard to approach open water but the views out over the pond are quite nice.

Distances

0.8 miles, round trip

Family with Young Kids

  • Not recommended

Experienced Hiker

  • 1 hour, round trip

Inexperienced Hiker

  • Not recommended

Callahan Brook Trail

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 30 toward Speculator. Continue for just over 16-miles to Jessup River Road (dirt) on the right. Follow here to the first major campsite on the right, park here.

Trail Description

This trail is not recommended for some users, not because of difficulty but because of difficulty to follow. From the campground locate the trail at the back side, it is not signed or marked and not frequently used. This trail is used mainly for short jaunts in the woods and to access the Miami River. The hike is relatively easy as far as difficulty but, as mentioned, tough to follow at times with a very narrow tread. The Miami River is a wonderful river for photography, birding, and fishing. At the end of the trail you would have to ford the river. On the opposite side a faint path continues but is much harder to follow.

Distances

3.0 miles, round trip

Family with Young Kids

  • Not recommended

Experienced Hiker

  • 2 hours, round trip

Inexperienced Hiker

  • Not recommended

Spruce Lake from Jessup River Road

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 30 toward Speculator. Continue for just over 16-miles to Jessup River Road (dirt) on the right. Follow here to Perkins Clearing (T-Intersection). Take a right onto Military Road to Sled Harbor. There is an intersection here, go straight to the Spruce Lake Trailhead, you will be at the trailhead in just over 7-miles.

Trail Description

From the trailhead you will start along a continuation of an old road, which has quickly become a foot trail to access the lake rather than a long hike along the Northville Placid Trail (NPT). This first section of trail is 1 mile in length and accesses the NPT about 2.25 miles south of Spruce Lake. You will gain a couple hundred feet in the climb along this section but it is very easy. Once on the NPT take a right and start a somewhat wet hike. There are a couple brook crossings along the way but they are relatively easy and narrow. You will arrive at the south end of Spruce Lake near lean-to #1.

Distances

3.2 miles

Family with Young Kids

  • 3.5 to 4 hours

Experienced Hiker

  • 2.5 to 3 hours

Inexperienced Hiker

  • 3.5 to 4 hours

Mud Pond

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28N and Route 30 in Long Lake follow Route 30 toward Tupper Lake. Continue through town and locate Kickerville Road on the right, about 0.6 miles past the bridge over Long Lake. Follow Kickerville Road to the Stone Building at the end. From here a dirt road passes to its right, this leads to the Cedarlands Boy Scout Camp. The road is marked as private but it is open to the public when the scouts are not in session. Drive down this dirt road for around 1-mile to the designated public parking on the left.

Trail Description

You can use the easement, lakes, and trails between August 23rd and June 23rd. From the parking area return to the road and take a left onto the access road and walk this for about 0.3 miles to a split in the road and three gates. Take a left and follow this forest road for the remaining 0.4 miles to the canoe carry for Mud Pond which will be on the left. The canoe carry is only about 150 feet long and slightly downhill. There are great views out over the pond.

Distance Round Trip

1.4 miles

Family with Young Kids

  • 1.5 hours

Experienced Hiker

  • 1 hour

Inexperienced Hiker

  • 1.5 hours

Billy's Bald Spot and Squash Pond

This is a private trail that is open to the public, so please respect the private property.

From the road, climb steeply along a trail that is marked generously with arrows. A short steep climb will bring you to Billy's Bald Spot, where there is a lean-to to relax in as you overlook Big Moose Lake.

To reach Squash Pond, follow the abandoned trail that's located behind the privy in the tall evergreens. The footprint of the trail is narrow and obscured by time and lack of use. Take your time and in a half mile you will come to the shore of Squash Pond. The pond is a small, quaint little backcountry gem.

Location

From the intersection of Route 28 and Big Moose Road in Eagle Bay, follow Big Moose Road. Continue for just under 6 miles, turn right on Martin Road, and follow that for 0.75 mile to the trailhead on the left. There is an obscure trailhead sign on the left which is hard to see. Drive slowly and park safely on the shoulder of the road as best as you can.

Distance

2.25 miles round trip

It can take experienced hikes more than three hours to complete this hike. 

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