Directions

The Old Dam Nature Trail loop, located near Limekiln Lake campsite #98 on the back side of the leach field, is an easy 1.3 mile hike. You can also access the Third Lake Creek Trail from here.

Beginning at the trailhead, which leads around the outlet of the lake, visitors might see Wood Warblers, woodpeckers, Winter Wrens, and Common and Hooded Mergansers.

Location

From downtown Inlet, travel 0.75 mile northeast on Route 28 and turn right Limekiln Lake Road. Follow that for 2 miles to the campsite entrance on the right. The trail is accessed in the DEC-run Limekiln Lake Campground.

Distance

An easy 1.3 mile loop.

Hikers and mountain bikers should expect to take less than an hour to complete this loop.

Winter Overview

The town of inlet highway department plows a four-car parking area at the beginning of the campsite road. Cross –country ski trails are groomed for both skate and traditional skiing. you can connect with the Old Dam Nature Trail and Third Lake Creek but plan on an all day ski through as the trail is not groomed and snowpack can be deep. The total distance of this loop could be more than 10 miles.

This trail leads north to Shallow Lake. After 1 mile, it crosses a log bridge over the bog. This is a wonderful area to see Black-backed and Northern Three Toed Woodpeckers, Gray Jays, Boreal Chickadees, Olive-Sided and Yellow Bellied Fly Catchers, White Throated, Swamp and Lincoln Sparrows, Rusty Blackbird, Solitary Vireo, Parula, Yellow Rumped, Palm, Nashville and Common Yellow Throat Warblers, Sawhet and Short-Eared Owls, and Red Breasted Nuthatch.

Location

This is a birding area located off Uncas Road, near the village of Raquette Lake. The trail is on the right when leaving the village.

Distances

3 mile, round-trip loop.

This hike can take more than three hours to clompete. It's moderately difficult for mountain biking.

Winter Overview

Recommended for snowshoe access only.

With many good parking spots around the Red River bridge, this trail along the Red River offers miles of access to all types of terrain. The trailhead starts an informal 1.8 mile loop that slips away from the left of the bridge through a replanted evergreen forest in an old sand pit.

The trail is for beginners and has very little elevation change. It winds beneath an old log road canopy of evergreens and hardwoods. When it spills back out on the main road, follow that to the right to return to the trailhead.

Location

The Moose River Recreation Area Primitive Camping Area is a 5-mile drive from the Limekiln entrance in Inlet. The gravel and dirt access road has a 15-mile-per-hour speed limit. The trailhead starts 50 yards over the Red River bridge, on the left.

Distance

1.8 miles round trip

It only takes a couple of hours to do this trail.

Estelle Pond | Winter

This trail is obscure and not marked, but can be followed without too much trouble. GPS, map and compass, and navigation experience is highly recommended.

Winter Overview and Trail Conditions:

Estelle Pond is not officially named as such, but this beaver pond is on the flanks of Estelle Mountain. From the trailhead follow the forest road through the grassy field and when it makes a hard left and starts uphill toward Death Falls look for the path/old trail on the right. It will most likely not be broken out but should still be easy enough to locate. The old trail is believed to be an access road to the Great Camp Sagamore and used to transport supplies and patron the "backway" through the forest, to give them more of a wilderness feel, I bet it worked, image a sleigh ride through this area?
Once on the old trail it's pretty easy to follow aside from a couple small spots, but take your time and look ahead rather than right in front of you to stay on it. There are a couple downed trees to get over slowing the pace a bit. The trail climbs a bit over 300' to the shore of the obscure pond. This resembles an old beaver pond with dead snags dotting it.

Ascent:

-320 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

3.0 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: Not recommended

Experienced Snowshoers: 2.5 to 3 hours

Inexperienced Snowshoers: Not recommended

Trailhead Location:

In Blue Mountain Lake follow Route 28 toward Raquette Lake for just under 10-miles to the trailhead. This trailhead is located on the left about 0.3 miles past the entrance to Golden Beach Campground. Look for a metal gate across a dirt access road. There is no trailhead sign. Parking in winter is a bit tricky, but it should be regularly plowed out.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Three: Mainly due to lack of use and the need to break trail

Additional Important Information:

The old road continues through to Sagamore Lake and Great Camp Sagamore, if you wanted to spot a car on that end.

Death Falls

Winter Overview and Trail Conditions:

Passing by the gate you will be on an old access road that brings you through an open field with the brook to your left. As you continue through you may notice a split in the trail. Right will lead you around to Estelle Pond, the left fork will lead to the base of the falls. You will have a small stream crossing to where you will be able to see the falls to your right.

Ascent:

-20 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

0.6 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 30 minutes

Experienced Snowshoers: 20 minutes

Out of Shape Snowshoers: 30 minutes

Trailhead Location:

In Blue Mountain Lake follow Route 28 toward Raquette Lake for just under 10-miles to the trailhead. This trailhead is located on the left about 0.3 miles past the entrance to Golden Beach Campground. Look for a metal gate across a dirt access road. There is no trailhead sign. Parking in winter is a bit tricky, but it should be regularly plowed out.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

One: This is a very short and easy trail, a perfect spot to recreate with the entire family.

Additional Important Information:

Do not go to the top of the falls in the winter it is a very slippery and dangerous location.

Coney Mountain Snowshoe Trail

Most of the trail is rocky but you wouldn't know it in winter unless conditions are less than favorable. All the rocks and imperfections of a trail are covered in snow, making for a much smoother walking surface. The trail you will find swings around the western slopes of the mountain with the steep slopes of Coney on your right. Soon the trail steepens and continues to move around to the northern slopes of the peak.

On the back side of the mountain you will come to the original path to the summit, located just below the summit. The last section is over slab rock; your snowshoes should be great traction. On the wide open summit you can see Goodman Mountain to the north and Mount Morris to the northeast. The frozen waters of Tupper Lake can be seen to the north as well and the wooded hills of the Horseshoe Lake Wild Forest to the west glisten in white. As far as views go, this is one of the best in the area. This well used trail and bald summit should be a highlight to your visit to the region.

Elevation:

2265 feet

Ascent:

515 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

2.2 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

  • Families with Kids: 2.5 to 3 hours
  • Experienced Snowshoers: 1.5 to 2 hours
  • Out of Shape Snowshoers: 2 to 2.5 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Route 30 and Route 28N in the Village of Long Lake follow Route 30 toward Tupper Lake. Follow here for just under 12-miles to trailhead on the right. A state DEC sign marks the location.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Two, good destination for a beginner snowshoe, but can be a bit steep in sections, otherwise this would be a one.

Sawyer Mountain Winter Hike

As one of the more popular short hikes in the region, this makes for a great first snowshoe destination for the kids. From the trailhead you will start to climb a bit before the trail levels off on a small plateau and becomes a very easy walk through the woods. There is one slightly steeper section as it comes to some open slab rock under the deep snow cover, making footing a bit tricky, but it soon eases up. You will crest over a lower summit of Sawyer and drop slightly to the viewing platform from a rocky outcropping. This summit is well sheltered giving ample opportunity for a relaxing summit experience and the opportunity to have some hot chocolate without battling strong, cold winds.

Elevation:

2580 feet

Ascent:

575 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

2.2 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

  • Families with Kids: 2.5 to 3 hours
  • Experienced Snowshoers: 2 hours
  • Out of Shape Snowshoers: 2.5 to 3 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 28/30 toward Blue Mountain Lake. Continue for just under 5-miles to the trailhead on the left.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

One: This is the perfect snowshoe trip for the entire family.

Rocky Mountain | Snowshoe Hike

Rocky Mountain is possibly the most popular hikes in the Inlet area, maybe even in Hamilton County. The trail for Rocky Mountain is short, it's steep, but it's a fun snowshoe, and a perfect destination for the entire family. At only 0.5 miles from trailhead to summit, you really get a serious bang for your buck. Starting off the trail really wastes no time becoming steep. With snowshoes it makes the going a bit more challenging, but not overly so, just take your time on the descent.

There are a few small areas where small rock shelves come into the pictures, if you decide to take the direct approach up them choose your footing carefully, typically other snowshoers make a trail around the rock to avoid the odd steps. The trail near the ends starts to flatten out and you soon come to an open rocky summit overlooking the Fulton Chain of Lakes.

Elevation:

2205 feet

Ascent:

475 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

1.0 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

  • Families with Kids: 2 to 3 hours
  • Experienced Snowshoers: 2 hours
  • Out of Shape Snowshoers: 2 to 3 hours

Trailhead Location:

Follow Route 28 west out of the village of Inlet and in no time you will see the trailhead on the right. This is a large parking area, paved but rough. The Rocky Mountain Trail is directly at the back of the parking area.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

One: This is a short snowshoe trip great for the entire family.

Snowy Mountain Snowshoe Hike

Snowy Mountain, at just under 4,000 feet in elevation, is one of the tallest peaks in the Indian Lake Region. Snowy is also one of the more challenging endeavors for winter climbing and snowshoeing in the area, and should not be taken as a quick afternoon jaunt. If you seek a challenge, this might be the trail for you.

The trail starts out quite mellow, with a slight incline, and stays like that for a ways. You will soon start to hear Beaver Brook to your right, and eventually you'll cross it a few times ialong the way. At about 2 miles the terrain gets steeper and only lets up on occasion.

The further in you go, the steeper the trail gets, and as you near the top you will come to a very steep section with tough footing. In snowshoes this final section, which brings you to a plateau, can be quite tough. To the right you can walk out to a tall ledge and have an outstanding overlook, be very careful here, as the drop is dangerous. The trail continues past the plateau and moderately climbs to the true summit, where the fire tower sits. There is no view from the summit, so you will need to climb the tower. Be sure you do — the views from that perch are outstanding.

Elevation:

3,899 feet

Ascent:

2,100 feet

Distance Round Trip:

7.8 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

  • Families with Kids: Nor recommended
  • Experienced Snowshoers: 4 to 5 hours
  • Out of Shape Snowshoers: 5 to 6 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 30 toward Speculator. Continue for just over 7 miles to the trailhead on the right. Parking is on the left.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Three: This is a very demanding snowshoe trip with steep terrain and modest distance.

Kings Flow East Snowshoe Trail

From Kings Flow parking; head out to the right and locate the King Flow East Trail – this is not marked. You will now ski along a heavily used trail that follows the eastern shore of Kings Flow, but not close enough to enjoy views. Please respect the rights of property owners and stay on the trail — there is no public access to the waterbody at this time. 

The trail has a slight climb and many rolling hills as you cross several drainages. After 1.1 miles you will come to the Puffer Pond Trail on the left, where you will need to head right. The trail here is used much less and may require you to make first tracks. Crossing more small brooks, makes a couple spots tough on skis, but still enjoyable in your seclusion. Ignore any side trails on your right as they lead to other destinations mush further away. The trail eventually ends on the side of Puffer Mountain.

Elevation Gain/Loss to Destination:

~260 feet

Distance Round Trip:

5.6 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

  • Families with Kids: Not recommended
  • Experienced Skiers: 2.5 to 3 hours
  • Beginner Skiers: 3.5 to 4 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Routes 28 and 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 30 toward Lake Pleasant. Continue for just under 0.5 miles to Big Brook Road. Follow that for 7.8 miles to the Kings Flow Parking Area. This is the trailhead for Chimney Mountain, Johns Pond, and Puffer Pond. This is an informal pay-to-use parking area, so please be sure to pay the small fee at the kiosk.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Two: mainly due to distance and lack of consistent use

Humphrey Mountain Snowshoe Trail

The Humphrey Mountain Trail has been around for decades, but is considered more of a path than a true trail. To date, the trail is still marked and maintained by a third party. It is in excellent condition for snowshoeing, but does not have a rewarding finish. From the trailhead you will follow the King Flow East Trail as it passes through the Siamese Pond Wilderness. This trail gets quite a bit of use up to the intersection for Puffer Pond, but beyond there the use is much more limited. Continue a ways further up the King Flow East Trail to an unmarked trail on the right with orange and yellow trail disks; this is the Humphrey Mountain Trail.

The trail will them move along an easy course through the forest over rolling hills and crossing several smaller brooks, including Humphrey Brook. Past the brook the trail climbs slightly and swings around hard to the base of Humphrey Mountain. From here the trail gets much steeper and works its way up the shoulder to a high col between two summits of Humphrey Mountain. The trail ends here at the location of a small open pit garnet mine, almost hidden in the depths of winter. To obtain the views of Humphrey Mountain a demanding half mile bushwhack is required.

Ascent:

1760 feet

Distance Round Trip:

6.9 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

  • Families with Kids: Not recommended
  • Experienced Snowshoers: 4 to 4.5 hours
  • Out of Shape Snowshoers: 5 to 6 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 30 toward Speculator. After 0.5 miles turn left onto Big Brook Road. Follow Big Brook Road all the way to the end at the King Flow Parking area for Chimney Mountain.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Two: While not overly difficult it does get quite steep at the end.

Additional Important Information:

This is an old trail that still appears on maps and at this time is maintained by someone.

Hiking over a frozen body of water can access you to areas not seen by most in the summer. With that being said it is a dangerous activity to cross frozen water bodies and should be done with care and respect for your environment. Know the ice conditions and be prepared for anything including heavy winds, snow drifts, whiteouts, slushy conditions, and thin ice.

Puffer Pond from the North

From the King's Flow parking area, follow the dirt road a bit further on foot and locate the trail on the right. Please respect the rights of property owners and stay on the trail — there is no public access to King's Flow at this time.

Straight at the intersection leads to Chimney Mountain. Once on the trail you will be on a foot path that is not heavily used but relatively flat. Once you cross over Carroll Brook you will start to climb quite steadily. The trail will continue on this climb up and over the shoulder of Bullhead Pond. The descent is swift and in no time brings you to the shore of Puffer Pond. Be sure to visit one of the two lean-to's on the pond for a place to have a comfortable and scenic lunch.

Ascent:

400 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

4.2 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 4 to 5 hours
Experienced Snowshoers: 2.5 to 3.5 hours
Out of Shape Snowshoers: 3 to 4 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Routes 28 and 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 30 toward Lake Pleasant. Continue for just under 0.5 miles to Big Brook Road. Follow here for 7.8 miles to King's Flow Parking Area. This is the trailhead for Chimney Mountain, Johns Pond and Puffer Pond. This is pay-to-use parking. Pay the $2 fee at the small kiosk.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Two

Additional Important Information:

There is an attractive lean-to on the shore of Puffer Pond, a great place to relax and have some hot cocoa.
Hiking over a frozen body of water can access you to areas not seen by most in the summer. With that being said it is a dangerous activity to cross frozen water bodies and should be done with care and respect for your environment. Know the ice conditions and be prepared for anything including heavy winds, snow drifts, whiteouts, slushy conditions, and thin ice.

Chimney Mountain Snowshoe Hike

This trail gets pretty good use in the winter and has become a very popular snowshoe destination. From the trailhead you will continue up the dirt road on foot for a short distance to the trailhead at the back. The trail will start to climb immediately but under very mellow conditions before starting a much more serious climb up the steeper slopes of the peak. You will come to the Chimney before the summit. Many often mistake the rock chimney location as the summit, while the true rocky summit is nearly a half mile further along the trail. Great views are located at both the chimney location and the summit.

Elevation:

2721 feet

Ascent:

1,000 feet

Distance Round Trip:

3 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

  • Families with Kids: 4 to 5 hours
  • Experienced Snowshoers: 2.5 to 4 hours
  • Out of Shape Snowshoers: 3 to 4 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Routes 28 and 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 30 toward Lake Pleasant. Continue for just under 0.5 miles to Big Brook Road. Follow here for 7.8 miles to King's Flow Parking Area. This is the trailhead for Chimney Mountain, Johns Pond and Puffer Pond. This is pay-to-use parking. Pay the $2 fee at the small kiosk. Please respect the rights of property owners and stay on the trail — there is no public access to Kings Flow at this time.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Two, good destination for a beginner snowshoe, but can be a bit steep in sections.

West Mountain Snowshoe Hike

West Mountain is a former fire tower peak, but even without the steel structure offers good views from its partially open summit. The length and the fact that the access road to the trailhead is closed limit its use by a large number of visitors.

From the trailhead you will drop slightly into an open hardwood forest on a trail that is quite narrow and a bit overgrown in areas. Soon you reach the trail that comes in from Brown's Tract Ponds. At this intersection take a right and follow an old woods road that is in excellent condition and flat snowshoeing. You will pass by several other side trails, most of which might not even be noticeable in winter, be sure to stay on the main trail. Another trail to Raquette Lake (the lake) will come in on the right.

Once you leave the woods road the trail becomes slightly more difficult over rolling hills and eventually to some very steep terrain. The steep terrain will bring you to a moderate walk along the ridge and then to the summit of West Mountain. The true summit is slightly in the woods but the views are in an open area just prior.

Elevation:

2902 feet

Ascent:

~1125 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

10.6 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

  • Families with Kids: Not recommended
  • Experienced Snowshoers: 6 to 8 hours
  • Out of Shape Snowshoers: Not recommended

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Route 28 and County Route 2 in Raquette Lake follow County Route 2 into the Village of Raquette Lake. Continue through the village to Brown's Tract Road also known as Uncas Road. This is a season use road and is closed in winter as a snowmobile trail. You will have to snowshoe the remaining 0.5 miles to the trailhead.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Four: Mainly due to distance and lack of winter use.

Kane Mountain Loop from Schoolhouse Road | Snowshoe

This trail is used much less seldom than the Green Lake Road trailhead, but still a worthy avenue to take. In winter it gets much less use and parking can be a slight issue. From the roadside you will start a climb that is immediate and very steady as you make your way up the old fire observers tote road. The trail is very wide, and in a couple areas can be a bit icy under the snow if there is not adequate coverage. You will first reach the old observers cabin with the tower just beyond. Outstanding views await the visitor to the cab of the tower.

Elevation:

2180 feet

Ascent:

600 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

1.4 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 2 to 2.5 hours

Experienced Snowshoers: 1.5 to 2 hours

Out of Shape Snowshoers: 2 to 2.5 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Route 8 and Route 10 in Piseco, follow Route 10 South toward Pine Lake. Just under 1.5 miles past Pine Lake, take a left onto Schoolhouse Road. The trail will be on the left in under 1-mile.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

One: Easy to moderate trail

Additional Important Information:

Stewart and Indian Lakes Snowshoeing Trail

This trail is used more as a XC ski trail but also makes for an easy to moderate snowshoe destination. From the trail register continue up the road for about 100-feet to the trail on the right. You will immediately cross a wooden bridge and continue on a steady but easy ascent through a gorgeous hardwood forest. About 2/3's of the way in you will first come to Stewart Lake on your left, which also makes for a perfect destination for a short snowshoe trip for the entire family. Beyond Stewart Pond the trail continues to climb slightly and rather quickly comes to the south end of Indian Pond.

Ascent:

420 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

4.6 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 4 to 5 hours

Experienced Snowshoers: 2 to 3 hours

Out of Shape Snowshoers: 3 to 4 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Route 8 and Route 10 in Piseco, follow Route 10 South toward Pine Lake. Just fewer than 2- miles past Pine Lake, take a left onto Green Lake Road. Follow Green Lake Road to the trailhead on the left. The short road to the actual trailhead in winter can be in unmaintained condition, be sure to park in a safe location.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

One to two: Easy to moderate trail

Additional Important Information:

Snowshoeing over a frozen body of water is an Adirondack past time; it can access you to areas not seen by most in the summer. With that being said it is a dangerous activity to cross frozen water bodies and should be done with care and respect for your environment. Know the ice conditions and be prepared for anything including heavy winds, snow drifts, whiteouts, slushy conditions, and thin ice.

Kane Mountain from Green Lake

From the trailhead you will start climbing almost immediately but never on too steep a grade and come to the firetower after only 0.8 miles. The trail as well as the summit is covered in an open hardwood forest. There are no views from the ground but 360 degree views will be awaiting you from the cab of the fire tower. The old fire observers cabin it to the left. The loop continues over the summit and gradually descends over a less frequently used trail that passes along the ridge. The trail will then pass by attractive Otter Lake before returning to the trailhead.

Elevation:

2180 feet

Ascent:

600 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

2.3 miles, loop

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids:  2.5 to 3.5 hours

Experienced Snowshoers: 2 to 2.5 hours

Out of Shape Snowshoers: 2.5 to 3 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Route 8 and Route 10 in Piseco, follow Route 10 South toward Pine Lake. Just under 2-miles past Pine Lake, take a left onto Green lake Road. Then drive Green Lake Road to the trailhead, which will be on the left. The short dirt road to the trailhead may or may not be plowed adequately for many cars, park in a safe location.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

One: Easy to moderate trail

Additional Important Information:

Snowshoeing over a frozen body of water can access you to areas not seen by most in the summer. With that being said it is a dangerous activity to cross frozen water bodies and should be done with care and respect for your environment. Know the ice conditions and be prepared for anything including heavy winds, snow drifts, whiteouts, slushy conditions, and thin ice.

Lower Sargent Pond Trail | Snowshoe

This trail is part of a much longer loop with Upper Sargent Pond and Grass Pond. From the trailhead you will remain on a very flat course and quickly come to Grass Pond which can be seen just slightly off the trail. The shore cannot easily be reached during most seasons, but in the winter it's much easier to access. As you snowshoe past the pond you remain on a mostly flat grade before slight descent brings you to a major intersection. Straight will bring you around the loop to Upper Sargent Pond; right brings you to Lower Sargent Pond. Then a left will bring you over to the lean-to location on this heart shaped pond, where you can have a nice place to relax with a hot cup of soup or piping beverage.

Elevation:

1795 feet

Ascent:

~50 feet of elevation loss to the lake

Distance Round Trip:

5.0 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 4 to 5 hours, trail could be too much for young children if not broken out, please see Lower Sargent Pond

Experienced Snowshoers: 2.5 to 3 hours

Out of Shape Snowshoers: 3 to 4 hours

Trailhead Location:

You can find these two trailheads off the Forked Lake Road in Long Lake. Start at the three corners in Long Lake drive south toward Blue Mountain Lake on Route 28N/30. North Point Road will be on the right, in 3.0 miles – drive down North Point Road. There will be a fork in the road a few miles in; right leads to Forked Lake Campsite, left to the trailheads. Continue 4.6 miles to the trailhead on the left.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Two: Mainly due to distance and lack of winter use

Additional Important Information:

Hiking over a frozen body of water can access you to areas not seen by most in the summer. With that being said it is a dangerous activity to cross frozen water bodies and should be done with care and respect for your environment. Know the ice conditions and be prepared for anything including heavy winds, snow drifts, whiteouts, slushy conditions, and thin ice.

Upper Sargent Pond Snowshoe Trail

This trail is part of a much longer loop with Lower Sargent Pond and Grass Pond. But to snowshoe the entire loop, is not all that great and it would require a second car to do a traverse, one car would require the skier to walk 1.5 miles of North Point Road, not a fun walk in winter. Upper Sargent Pond is an outstanding stand-alone destination, especially for younger children who want to try a new sport.

From the trailhead you will drop slightly and climb a bit to a small hogback before being on a mostly flat trail. A slight climb part way in will bring you to a small descent to the intersection for Upper Sargent Pond. The spur trail is not easily seen, but it leads left for 0.2 miles to the shore.

Elevation:

1824 feet

Ascent:

~40 feet of elevation loss to the lake

Distance Round Trip:

2.8 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 2.5 to 3 hours

Experienced Snowshoers: 2 to 2.5 hours

Out of Shape Snowshoers: 2.5 to 3 hours

Trailhead Location:

You can find these two trailheads off the Forked Lake Road in Long Lake. Start at the three corners in Long Lake drive south toward Blue Mountain Lake on Route 28N/30. North Point Road will be on the right, in 3.0 miles – drive down North Point Road. There will be a fork in the road a few miles in; right leads to Forked Lake Campsite, left to the trailheads. Continue 3.1 miles to the trailhead on the left.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

One: This is an easy snowshoe for all ages, and an excellent place to start out in a new sport

Additional Important Information:

Hiking over a frozen body of water can access you to areas not seen by most in the summer. With that being said it is a dangerous activity to cross frozen water bodies and should be done with care and respect for your environment. Know the ice conditions and be prepared for anything including heavy winds, snow drifts, whiteouts, slushy conditions, and thin ice.

Wilson Pond Snowshoe Trail

Winter Overview and Trail Conditions:

In the winter Wilson Pond makes for a much more exciting ski tour, but the ski tour is not great for everyone. However, if you can't ski to Wilson Pond, you should snowshoe to it.

From the trailhead you will snowshoe over the embankment to the trail register and start on a very easy trail with several small rolling hills. The trail is usually well packed from heavy use at least to Loon Brook. Soon you will find yourself passing by Grass Pond to your left, it can be seen through the trees. A cross-road is found here, ignore this and stay straight. In a bit you will be at a short steep descent to a crossing of Loon Brook. Loon brook is not too big, but the crossing can be a bit more cautious than expected. Especially during a warm spell, this brook will have to be crossed with care and might even require scouting a bit up and down stream. A bridge of sorts was to be built, but that may not yet be the case.

Past the crossing the trail follows the shore for a bit before climbing somewhat steeply to higher ground. The trail will continue to climb steadily through the Blue Ridge Wilderness. Some rolling hills will be intermixed but mostly you will be gaining slight elevation near to the top of a small unnamed knoll. Eventually the trail makes a very head left and starts a moderate ski to the shore of Wilson Pond and the lean-to sitting at this location. The lean-to makes for a great location to relax, think about your day, look upon the slopes of Blue Ridge across the pond, and enjoy a hot beverage.

Elevation:

2156 feet

Ascent:

300 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

5.8 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 4 to 5 hours, not recommended for really young children

Experienced Snowshoers: 2 to 3 hours

Out of Shape Snowshoers: 3 to 4 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Blue Mountain Lake follow Route 28 toward Raquette Lake. Continue for 2.5 miles to the state trailhead on the left.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Two: Mainly due to distance

Additional Important Information:

There is an attractive lean-to on the shore of Wilson Pond.

Hiking over a frozen body of water can access you to areas not seen by most in the summer. With that being said it is a dangerous activity to cross frozen water bodies and should be done with care and respect for your environment. Know the ice conditions and be prepared for anything including heavy winds, snow drifts, whiteouts, slushy conditions, and thin ice.

Goodman Mountain | Snowshoe Hike

This old road used to be Highway 10 between Long Lake and Tupper Lake; it has now been turned into a wonderful trail that leads to Goodman Mountain. The DEC during the summer of 2014 created a trail to the summit of Goodman Mountain; this will officially be the first winter of the new trail, better get to it. At the backside of the parking area for Lumberjack Springs there is a kiosk and trail register; directly after is a wonderful, solid new bridge over Cold Brook.

Proceeding up the trail a short distance in you will be immediately welcomed by a very wide trail through the forest, this is old Route 10. During non-snow conditions the tarmac can still be seen in areas. The steep slopes and cliffs of Goodman will be to your left, set back in the woods. Soon you will begin to gently climb to a height-of-land where the trail leaves the old road on your left: this is roughly 1-mile in from the trailhead. Goodman's summit is only 0.25 miles away as the crow flies, but the trail swings around the steep slopes to avoid unnecessary erosion in the summer and making the approach much more accessible and achievable for just about everyone.

Continuing on through a wonderful open hardwood forest, the snow deepens beneath you and balls of white drape over your head from the bare hardwood branches. The trail will continue to swing gently around the base of the mountain and slowly ascend. Then a sudden turn toward the peak, with a bit steeper pitch will bring you to the shoulder of Goodman. The trail then follows the ridgeline before it finally ascends to the partially open summit from the backside.

Expect the trail to have moderate use with frequently packed trails. After a heavy snowstorm it may take a while to get packed out again. Being a new trail, it popularity will gain slowly as the word gets out about its creation.

Elevation:

2178 feet

Ascent:

570 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

3.2 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 2.5 to 3.5 hours

Experienced Snowshoers: 2 to 2.5 hours

Out of Shape Snowshoers: 2.5 to 3 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Route 28N and Route 30 in the Village of Long Lake follow Route 30 toward Tupper Lake. Follow here for just under 13.1 miles to Lumber Jack Spring on the right. Lumberjack Spring is not marked, the trailhead is located here, and a DEC trail sign marks the location.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

One; Goodman is excellent for a beginner snowshoe trip and a perfect spot to recreate with the entire family.

Additional Important Information:

There is another excellent viewing, in the other direction just below the summit off the trail. This is located a couple hundred feet along an old herdpath with blazes on the trees. Goodman Mountain on some older maps is named Litchfield Hill.

Mount Frederica

The summit cliffs of Mount Frederica overlook lovely Lake Lila in the William C. Whitney Wilderness Area in Hamilton County. There is a hiking trail from the Lake Lila parking area, or the trail can be accessed by paddlers from the western shore of Lake Lila.

How to Get There

From the intersection of Routes 30 and 28 in Long Lake, proceed 7.1 miles northwest on Route 30 to a left turn onto Sabattis Road (CR 10). (This is a half-circle road, with two access points on Route 30.) Travel 2.9 miles to a left turn. There are a number of signs at this intersection, including a sign for Lake Lila and Little Tupper Lake Headquarters. The sign directs you to the Lake Lila Road (reached in 4.5 miles). After driving 4.5 miles, take a left onto the Lake Lila access road. Travel for 5.6 miles to reach the Lake Lila parking area. The speed limit on this road is 15 mph. A high clearance vehicle is helpful on this rough dirt road, but a low clearance vehicle can make it with great care.

Trail Description

There is a kiosk and trail register in the Lake Lila parking area. The 4.5 mile hiking trail follows an old dirt road in a westerly direction around the north side of Lake Lila. After 1.5 miles, views of Lake Lila appear as the trail reaches the northern edge of the lake. For the next 1.5 miles, there are views of the lake as the trail continues west and then south along the western edge of Lake Lila. At the 3 mile point, a sign points out a right turn for Mount Frederica (with 1.5 miles left to reach the summit). The trail continues on an old dirt road and crosses the old railroad bed. About halfway on this last 1.5 mile section, there is a right turn onto a hiking trail. Watch for the "Trail" sign. The trail gradually climbs up to the cliffs of Mount Frederica. There are 180 degree views overlooking Lake Lila and many mountains. Blue Mountain is a prominent peak in the view-line.

For Paddlers

Paddlers on Lake Lila can access the trail to Mount Frederica from the western shore of Lake Lila. There is an open area where the old Lodge used to be. Just to the right (north) of this location is a sign for camp sites 8 &9. This is a good place to leave your canoe/kayak. There is a sign for the trail at this location. Take the short trail up to the old dirt road and head right for a couple hundred feet to the left turn for the trail to Mount Frederica. (If you take-out farther north, you may need to hike south on the dirt road to pick up the trail.) The description of the 1.5 mile trail up Mount Frederica is the same as above.

Elevation

2170'

Distances

4.5 miles to the summit (1.5 miles to the summit for paddlers from the western shore of Lake Lila)

Family with Young Kids

  • 3 hours to the summit

Experienced Hiker

  • 1.5 to 2 hours to the summit

Out of Shape Hiker

  • 2.5 to 3 hours to the summit

Additional Information

Bicycles are allowed on the Lake Lila Road, but not beyond the parking area on the trail to Mount Frederica.

Winter

Visitors can snowshoe or cross country ski on the Lake Lila Road in winter. It is a seasonal use road that is not plowed or groomed.

Bald Mountain

While not part of the Hamilton County Fire Tower Challenge, this hike is part of the Adirondack Fire Tower Challenge. With a long rocky spine and several outstanding views, this fire tower peak is sure to impress and is totally worth the short ride over from the Inlet area.

From the trailhead the route starts out quite flat over easy terrain, but wastes no time in starting the climb. You will soon find that the footing can be a bit tough as the grade steepens. As you climb higher a rock spine will be under you, possibly unnoticed, but you should notice the trail narrowing.

Views will start to appear out over the Fulton Chain of Lakes well before the summit and you'll soon see the fire tower in front of you. The tower is open to the public and maintained by volunteers. The steps can be very icy and the wind quite powerful, so be prepared.

Location

From the intersection of Route 28 and Uncas Road in Inlet, follow Route 28 toward Old Forge. Continue for just under 5 miles to county Route 93 on the right — you should see a sign on Route 28 for Rondaxe Mountain. Drive down county Route 93 for about 0.5 mile to the trailhead on the left.

Elevation

2,350 feet

Ascent

400 feet

Distance

2 miles round trip

It will take experienced hikers a couple of hours to do this hike.

Additional Important Information

Under low snow conditions, it may be best to use microspikes for traction. Ice tends to build up on steeper slopes when ample snow is not available.

Rock Pond | Snowshoeing

You will notice this gets very little winter use from snowshoers, however, it's not too farfetched to see ice fisherman out on the horizon. From the parking area you will start your snowshoe trip on an easy trail with very little elevation change. Johnny Mack Brook is to your right, but not as noticeable this time of year. On occasion the current will be rapid enough to cause the ice not to freeze. You quickly will come to a crossing with a snowmobile trail, just shy of the pond. Continue straight across the snowmobile trail and locate a narrow path, possibly obstructed by heavy snow on the trees, this leads out to the pond. If you take a right onto the snowmobile trail and cross a wood bridge you will also have other opportunities to approach the pond. The snowmobile trails go on for a very long time and eventually come out into Indian Lake.

Elevation:

1713 feet

Ascent:

-80 Feet

Distance Round Trip:

1.6 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 1 to 1.5 hours

Experienced Snowshoers: 1 hour

Out of Shape Snowshoers: 1 to 1.5 hours

Trailhead Location:

From the intersection of Route 30 and Route 28 in Indian Lake follow Route 28/30 for 6.0 miles to the trailhead on the right.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

One: This is a very short and easy trail, a perfect spot to recreate with the entire family.

Additional Important Information:

Hiking on any frozen body of water is dangerous. You should know the conditions of the ice before attempting to do so and even then at your own risk.

Owls Head Mountain | Winter Snowshoeing

This rather prominent peak in the Long Lake area is made up of four separate summits, two of which are referred to as the horns. These horns give the mountain the look of an owl's head – a great horned owl's head to be a bit more exact. Atop its tallest summit sits a fire tower that was erected in 1919 after the original wooden one was abandoned. The tower then became inactive in the 1970's. Under the help of Friends of the Owl's Head Fire Tower it has been restored and is open to the public to enjoy. Owl's Head has outstanding and vast views from the cliffs, if climbing a tower is not your cup of tea.

The trail starts out climbing right from the start as it makes its way up through an open hardwood forest. After a mile or so you will come to an intersection with a side trail to Lake Eaton on the right, avoid this and make a sharp left.

The trail soon begins to climb steadily and gains some decent elevation. This long section of climbing slowly mellows out in a col between two of the smaller peaks of Owl's Head. Unfortunately the trail then descends off this high ridge into a shallow valley at the base of the true summit. In this valley is the site of the observer's cabin, where only remnants and the concrete footers remain.

The final push to the summit is very steep and can be a bit slippery in spots. If the trail is not broken out, this section can be very tiring. As the trail starts to moderate again, the base of the fire tower comes into view on the horizon.

From the partially open summit, Long Lake can be seen below with Blue Mountain in the background. From the tower a 360 degree view is afforded with mind blowing views of the Central Adirondacks and High Peaks Region off in the distance. The Seward Mountains stand tall over everything in the area. The large dome of Kempshall Mountain (a former fire tower peak) sits along the Shore of Long Lake. Climbing the tower can be a chore in the winter. Expect the staircase to be VERY SLIPPERY. The winds will be very apparent and the wind chill dangerously cold if you are not dressed properly.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in the Town of Long Lake follow Route 30 toward Tupper Lake. Continue for about 2-miles to Endion Road on the left. Follow Endion Road for 2-miles or so to the trailhead for Owl's Head on the right. A large parking area is located at this point.

Elevation

2812'

Ascent

1150'

Approximate Time Round Trip:

  • Families with Kids: 5 to 5.5 hours
  • Experienced Snowshoers: 3 to 4 hours
  • Out of Shape Snowshoers: 4.5 to 5 hours

Distance Round-Trip

Trailhead to the summit = 3.1 miles

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Three; Owl's Head can be a very tough winter peak to climb. The winter season brings much fewer people to the region, making this mountain much less visited than many others. The upper reaches are quite steep.

Additional Important Information:

In winter the intersection with Lake Eaton can be easily followed rather than the sharp turn onto the summit trail. While generally always plowed, the parking area could be snowed in. Climbing the fire tower in winter can be dangerous, be very careful.

Goodnow Mountain | Snowshoe

Trail Description and Winter Conditions

Goodnow is a very prominent peak when seen from Route 28N heading toward Newcomb. This ragged looking mountain is home to one of the few fire towers remaining in the Adirondack Park. While resting just outside of Hamilton County this mountain makes for a great destination for those staying in the Long Lake Region.

From the trailhead you will start to climb a bit steeply to a higher plateau where the trail is very easy to snowshoe. As you move along, the trail will slowly gain elevation as it passes through an open mixed forest. The trail swings hard to the west where it will gain the final portion along the original mountain trail. At this time the trail will swing back east and along a ridge line. There is an old horse barn that you will pass along the way to the summit. This horse barn is an excellent spot for a break, or even lunch.

Upon the summit you will come to the fire tower. The tower is in great condition and should be climbed by all who visit. Be extra careful in the winter, as the tower stairs can be very slippery and dangerous. Expect high winds and a serious wind chill from the tower. This trail is heavily used and typically gets broken out relatively fast after a snow storm.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28N and Route 30 in the Town of Long Lake follow Route 28N toward Newcomb. Continue for about 12-miles to the trailhead on the right.=

Elevation

2685'

Ascent

1068'

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 3 to 4 hours

Experienced Snowshoers: 2 to 3 hours

Out of Shape Snowshoers: 2.5 to 3.5 hours

Distance Round-Trip

3.8 miles

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Two; while a rather moderate climb there is some decent elevation gain from the trailhead.

Additional Important Information:

Climbing the fire tower in winter can be dangerous due to heavy winds, wind chill, and icy conditions, be very careful.

Blue Mountain | Snowshoe Trail

Trail Description and Winter Conditions

Blue Mountain is one of the taller mountains in the Adirondack Park and one of the most popular in the Hamilton County Region. Affording outstanding views and a decent snowshoe challenge to summit, it attracts large numbers of people all year long. Blue is also home to an Adirondack Fire Tower, a small piece of region history.

From the trailhead you will quickly come to an old access road which allows for easy snowshoeing and a great warm up to the day. However this doesn't last, the trail quickly starts to gain elevation and crosses a very attractive frozen stream bed along the way, where ice formations are quite unique. The climbing really kicks in at about 1.25 miles and continues to be quite steep as it passes over open rock slabs. These slab rocks tend to be very icy, especially when you can't see the ice under the snow – pay extra close attention on the descent. The steep terrain will leave way for a gentle hike along the ridge to the fire tower on the summit. There are smaller views from the land and if you poke around there are others. The best views are from the stairs on the tower itself, the cab of the fire tower is closed and locked. The old observer's cabin is just over the rise.

Expect the Blue Mountain Trail to be heavily used, even when there seems to be few others on the trail. The route is broken out and hardened regularly by locals and visitors.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 30 and 28 in Blue Mountain Lake, follow Route 30 toward Long Lake for around 1.5 miles to the trailhead parking on the right. The trailhead is at the top of the long hill past the Adirondack Museum.

Elevation

3760'

Ascent

1569'

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 4 to 5 hours

Experienced Snowshoers: 2.5 to 3 hours

Out of Shape Snowshoers: 3 to 4 hours

Distance Round-Trip

4.0 miles

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Four; Blue Mountain is a very steep mountain in sections. There is typically heavy icy on the steeper portions due to running water, traction can be difficult making certain sections fun but slightly scary too.

Additional Important Information:

Climbing the fire tower in winter can be dangerous due to heavy winds, wind chill, and icy conditions, be very careful. Under low snow conditions, the upper portion of the climb can be very slippery and icy.

Castle Rock Loop | Winter

Initially you will be following a private dirt road, please stay on the marked route. The trail markers are on the power poles, but when in doubt keep right. After a short distance you will leave the road and at this point you will have to put on your snowshoes if you haven't already. Sometimes the road is packed enough, and often plowed throughout the winter. Within a few hundred feet of leaving the road you will come to split in the trail. Follow the trail left over a small foot bridge to do the loop in a clockwise direction. This bridge crosses the outlet to Chub Pond, which in the winter looks more like a snow covered field. Continuing on along a nice mellow trail you will come to an intersection with a spur trail on your left which leads to Blue Mountain Lake. At the trail intersection you will start a steep and continuous climb up the shoulder of Castle Rock. The ascent to the Castle Rock trail is very steep for a short period of time. Footing can be difficult along this section, but under most circumstances, it is just steep. Above the steep section it moderates to a nice grade.

As you crest the steeper section you will be able to see the cliffs of Castle Rock in front of you. Soon you will come to another intersection with the yellow trail. Here you will need to go right. From here the climb gets much steeper with large steps over rocks and roots. This tends to be a tricky spot with snowshoes, but you will need them or another form of traction. In a short distance you will be on the open rock summit of Castle Rock overlooking Blue Mountain Lake. After you have relaxed and soaked up the views return to the last intersection and follow the red trail to the right. This section of loop, especially in the winter gets very little use in comparison; expect it to not be properly packed.

If you decide to go you will drop down slightly to a fork in the red trail. Left leads to Upper Sargent Pond and right leads back to the trailhead. Continue on following the red trail as you are lead through open woods on a side slope, natural springs run off Peaked Mountain and in some cases can cause slushy conditions. The trail at this point is rolling hills eventually you will at the shores of Chub Pond again. From here continue on a moderate to easy trail as it leads back to the first split you had this day – near the footbridge. Follow left back to the road and back to the trailhead.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 30 and Route 28N in the Town of Long Lake follow Route 30/28N toward Blue Mountain Lake. Continue into Blue Mountain Lake and pass by the Adirondack Museum. Just pat the Adirondack Museum and locate Maple Lodge Road. Follow this rod to the hiker parking and the trail register; park in designated area only please.

Elevation

2430'


Ascent

570'

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 2.5 to 3 hours
Experienced Snowshoers: 2 to 2.5 hours
Out of Shape Snowshoers: 2.5 to 3 hours

Distance Round-Trip

3.0 miles, loop
3.0 miles, Castel Rock and back

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

Three; Castle Rock gets a three based on distance of the loop and most importantly the steepness of the terrain and difficulty on that steep terrain.

Additional Important Information:

The steep upper portion can be very difficult on the descent, especially in snowshoes. Take your time and be careful on this section.

OK Slip Falls

OK Slip Falls is one of the highest waterfalls in the Adirondacks. In the summer of 2014, a new trail to the falls opened making this hidden gem accessible to the public. The spectacular waterfall has become an extremely popular hiking destination.

How to Get There

The parking area for OK Slip Falls, in the Hudson Gorge Wilderness Area, is located 7.5 miles east of the intersection of Routes 30 and 28 in Indian Lake on the south side of Route 28 at the end of a paved road that intersects the highway. There is a wooden sign for the Hudson Gorge Wilderness Area at the parking lot. If you are traveling from the east, the parking area is located 4.4 miles west after crossing the second railroad bed in North River along Route 28 as the highway leads up and away from the Hudson River. The trailhead is located on the north side of Route 28 two-tenths of a mile west of the parking area. So hikers will need to walk along the highway for two-tenths of a mile and cross the road to reach the trailhead. The wooden trail sign lists that this is the access to Ross, Whortleberry, and Big Bad Luck Ponds in addition to OK Slip Falls.

Trail Description and Distance

The trail to OK Slip Falls is 3 miles long. Adding the two-tenths of a mile walk from the parking area makes the round trip distance 6.4 miles. The trail continues eight-tenths of a mile past the falls and ends at the Hudson River. If this optional section is added, the round trip distance becomes 8 miles.

The first half-mile of the trail follows the existing route to Ross, Whortleberry, and Big Bad Luck Ponds. After a half-mile, the trail to OK Slip Falls branches right. After an additional 1.5 miles, a dirt road is encountered. The trail continues left on the dirt road for a couple hundred feet before branching off to the right. The last mile is along what appears to be the remnants of an old dirt road. A sign shows the right hand turn that leads a short distance to the falls. You will hear the waterfall as you approach the sign! To continue on to the Hudson River, head left for eight-tenths of a mile.

In the first two miles of the trail to OK Slip Falls, there are several muddy sections, so hiking boots are highly recommended. The trail is still new and there is ongoing work to add wooden walkways over the wet areas. The last mile to the falls is in great shape. There are gradual ups and downs in the first 3 miles of the trail. The forests along the trail are mostly deciduous and mixed deciduous-coniferous, with many large trees, including Red Maple, Beech, Birches, Aspens, White Pine, and Eastern Hemlock. There are lovely mosses, wildflowers, and fungus found along the trail. The area between North River and Indian Lake contains vast wetlands and Moose are often observed in this region, so watch for Moose tracks! You can also find many bird species along with amphibians and reptiles on the hike. Photographic opportunities abound!

OK Slip Falls is breathtaking and there are two lovely areas to view the waterfalls. The viewing areas are on the east side of a deep gorge, and the waterfall is viewed to the west. There is a hill to your back as you view the falls. Once the sun rises above the hill, the waterfalls are bathed in sunlight. If you are interested in photographing the falls, arriving during the morning works best, as the falls are shaded by afternoon (but still gorgeous even in shade!).

Optional 8/10 mile segment to the Hudson River: This trail segment is much more strenuous. After leaving OK Slip Falls, the trail heads around the head of the gorge and drops steeply down to a wooden bridge over OK Slip Brook. From this location you can see the void where the water drops over the edge of the cliffs! There is a well-worn herd path a short distance along the brook to the head of the falls. Great care should be taken in this area with such dangerous vertical cliffs. After crossing the bridge, the trail heads back up to the top of the gorge and continues toward the Hudson River. From the top of the gorge, it is nearly a 400 foot drop in elevation to the river. The trail uses switchbacks, which helps ease the hiking, but it is still strenuous to climb back up. You can hear the rapids on the Hudson River below as you approach this steep area. The trail ends at the confluence of OK Slip Brook and the Hudson River. If you hike a short distance to the left, there is a sandy beach and an area where rocks jut out into the Hudson River. It is a lovely place to rest and have a food break.

Hiking Time Estimate

The round trip to OK Slip Falls is 6.4 miles from the parking area with gentle ups and downs. Allow at least a half-day for this hike, and possibly longer if you want to linger at the falls viewing area, or spend time photographing flora and fauna along the way. Adding the segment to the Hudson River brings the round trip distance to 8 miles and adds steeper ascents and descents to the bottom of the Hudson River Gorge. Allow enough time to add this section – likely a full day for most hikers.

Winter

The trail to OK Slip Falls would be appropriate for a winter snowshoe hike. This popular trail will likely see a lot of hiker traffic even in winter. So you can probably count on a broken snow trail!

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