Big and Little Pisgah Mountains

These small peaks are somewhat obscure with no real trail to the summit. GPS, map and compass, and navigation experience is a must.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 28 toward North Hudson for around 1.4 miles to Chain Lake Road on the left and drive Chain Lake Road to the gate at the end. The distance to the gate depends on the time of year you visit. There is a gate that is often closed for mud season, but during non-mud season you can get through to another gate about a mile further in.

Trail Description

From the gate you will start your hike along the forest road. You will either be by the outer gate during mud season or the inner gate which is by the old hunting club house. Continue on the road until you are on the SW side of Big Pisgah which ends up being the height-of-land along the road before it starts to descend to Mud Pond. This is a great place to start with very open woods. As you get closer you will come to the open face of the mountain with a grassy coverage and outstanding views. The summit is a bit higher and doesn't have as nice of views but many more can be had from the open areas just below.

To continue to Little Pisgah head off the NW ridge and descend gently to the col and climb the easy slopes to the open summit and the survey disk. There are seasonal views from the top but if you descend directly toward Mud Pond you will have additional views on the way down. The forest on this side is jumbled with loose rock so take your time; you should pop out of the forest someplace near Mud Pond and follow the road back to your car.

Elevation

2102' (Big Pisgah), 2013' (Little Pisgah)

Approximate Round Trip Distance

6.25 miles

Estimated Round Trip Time

Family with Young Kids

  • Not recommended

Experienced Hiker

  • 3.5 to 4 hours

Inexperienced Hiker

  • Not recommended

Mud Pond Mountain

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28N and Route 30 in Long Lake follow Route 30 toward Tupper Lake. Continue through town and locate Kickerville Road on the right, about 0.6 miles past the bridge over Long Lake. Follow Kickerville Road to the Stone Building at the end. From here a dirt road passes to its right, this leads to the Cedarlands Boy Scout Camp. The road is marked as private but it is open to the public when the scouts are not in session. Drive down this dirt road for around 1-mile to the designated public parking on the left.

Trail Description

You can use the easement, lakes, and trails between August 23rd and June 23rd. From the parking area return to the road and take a left onto the access road and walk this for about 0.3 miles to a split in the road and three gates. Take a left and follow this forest road to access the Boy Scout Trail up the Mountain. The trail up the mountain will be on your left on the west side of McRorie Lake. The trail is slightly obscure and not used all that much, but easy enough to follow with some care.

The road approach is very easy and you will pass by two canoe carry trails to Mud Pond and one to McRorie Lake. The trail is steep, as is the entire mountain on this aspect. You can also choose to go off trail, if you have the experience, to access the cliffs with more outstanding views. This is not recommended for children or inexperienced hikers, however. The views toward the High Peaks and over McRoarie Lake are some of the finest in the region. The actual summit of the mountain is wooded but the trail does continue over the true top and all the way to the wooded summit of Grampus Lake Mountain and beyond, if you are interested in extending your day.

Distance Round Trip

6.0 miles

Family with Young Kids

  • 5 to 6 hours

Experienced Hiker

  • 4 to 5 hours

Inexperienced Hiker

  • 5 to 6 hours

Cascade Mountain Overlook

This final destination lies off any developed and mapped trail system; the use and understanding of GPS and/or map and compass is highly recommended. When traveling off-trail you will experience hazards not realized on a trail, expect more difficult and varying conditions and always lean toward safety as a priority.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Big Moose Road in Eagle Bay follow Big Moose Road. Continue for 1.3 miles to the Cascade Lake Trailhead on the right.

Trail Description

This route starts out by following the Cascade Lake Trail. You will hike this well used trail over easy terrain as it drops slightly to the where the old trail comes in on the right. Follow here to the left along an old forest road which is solely used as a foot trail now. Quickly you come to the loop around Cascade Lake, take a right. In this area you can leave the trail at any point and head just east of south up the steep slopes of Cascade Mountain. The forest is open and easy to navigate. In around 0.5 miles you will come to the rock boulder balancing on the shoulder of Cascade Mountain. This is the only true view from the Ridge of Cascade Mountain and it's a dandy.

Distance Round-Trip

3.5 miles

Experienced hikers can complete this hike in about 3 hours. It is not recommended for families with kids or inexperienced hikers.

Speculator Mountain

This destination lies off any developed and mapped trail system; the use and understanding of GPS and/or map and compass is highly recommended. When traveling off-trail you will experience hazards not realized on a trail, expect more difficult and varying conditions and always lean toward safety as a priority.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 30 and Route 8 in Speculator follow Route 8/30 toward Wells. Continue just under 1-mile to County Route 11 on the right and turn here. Continue on CR 11 to Gilmantown Road on the left. Follow here for 2.8 miles to Gilman Lake access on the right.

Trail Description

What makes this peak so interesting, its historical nature I would have to say, and the views along the way are pretty good too. As mentioned this peak has no trail, so you will have to be comfortable with off-trail travel and self-navigation. The best access is to paddle across Gilman Lake to gain the eastern slopes, but if a boat is not your forte, you could climb over Guideboard Hill to the north.

Once you paddle across Gilman Lake you will be a short 1.2 miles, as the crow flies, distance from the summit. The terrain is mostly open hardwoods with a thick layer of chin hobble in some areas. As you approach the summit it gets very steep and sections of cliffs will try and ward you off. Be careful if you encounter these and work your way around them. The steep slopes and cliffs will be what gives you your views, so don't ignore their tops, just be careful around them as you would on any mountain.

The summit is wooded but has an eyebolt placed there by Verplank Colvin in the late 1800's to early 1900's. Colvin was the Adirondacks first surveyor. Retrace your steps back to you boat and be sure to spend a bit of extra time on the lake.

Elevation

2977'

Estimated Round Trip Distance

2.5 miles

Estimated Round Trip Time

Family with Young Kids

  • Not recommended

Experienced Hiker

  • 4 to 5 hours

Inexperienced Hiker

  • Not recommended

Mitchell Ponds Mountain

This small peak is obscure with no real trail to the summit; but does have a faint herd path to follow once you leave the access trail. GPS, map and compass, and navigation experience is a must.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Limekiln Road in Inlet follow Limekiln Road to the Moose River Plains Road. Follow the Moose River Plains Road for around 5.5 miles to the trailhead on the right. Roughly 0.5 miles past Rock Dam Road.

Trail Description

From the same trailhead as you would use to approach Mitchell Ponds from the north follow this multi-use trail to the Shores of Upper Mitchell Pond. Pass by the spur trail to Lower Mitchell Pond and cross the small inlet on a sketchy bridge. Once across continue left on the main trail for a bit to get away from the wetlands and enter the forest here.

The forest is very open and grades are super easy. Keep on a heading to the east side of the ridge to gain the most views. As you crest the ridge the long open rocky spine will be right in front of you and apparent. The open rocky ridge/ledge west and is over a half mile long to the actual summit of Mitchell Ponds Mountain. Be very careful along the ridge it is steep and narrow.

Elevation

2480'

Round Trip Distance

6.2 miles

Estimated Round Trip Time

Family with Young Kids

  •  Not recommended

Experienced Hiker

  • 4 to 5 hours

Inexperienced Hiker

  • Not recommended

Barker Mountain

This small peak is obscure with no real trail to the summit; but does have a faint herd path to follow once you leave the access trail. GPS, map and compass, and navigation experience is a must. While no trail exists on this small rewarding summit, future plans may change that to open up the option of a wonderful family hiking destination. Keep checking back with us for updates.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Blue Mountain Lake follow Route 28/30 for just under 4-miles to the access road for O'Neill Flow on the left. This access road is very rough and should be driven with extreme care. Follow here over Rock River and at the next intersection take a right, there is a sign here for Barker Pond. This next section of road has the potential to be slightly flooded by beaver so you may end up having to walk this; the road dead ends at the trail for Barker Pond.

Trail Description

From the Barker Pond Trailhead the mountain is to your left, the opposite side of the road as the trail. This lower portion of the mountain has been logged and is a bit hard to walk through. The terrain is not steep and never at any point is very thick, but small bands of spruce near the top. The top has outstanding views to the west and southwest from a narrow band of open rock.

Elevation

2180'

Round Trip Distance

1.0 miles

Estimated Round Trip Time

  • Family with Young Kids: Not recommended
  • Experienced Hiker: 2 hours
  • Inexperienced Hiker: Not recommended

Lower Sargent Pond from Tioga Point State Campground

How to get there

The only access is by boat. Access Tioga Point Campground via Raquette Lake and locate the trail within the campground.

Trail Description

This trail gets used a decent amount so it's well marked and easy to follow. The trail doesn't get much for day use visitors but mainly by campers at the state campground. Leaving from the point you won't be all that far from Eldon Lake on your right, a picturesque lake worth a gander. Wetland areas near the trail make it a bit wet in spots but nothing of too much concern. This flat hike is while mostly in the forest gives you a great opportunity to stretch your legs at camp and visit the gorgeous shores of Lower Sargent Pond.

Elevation Change

50'

Round Trip Distance

8.0 miles

Family with Young Kids

  • 6 to 7 hours

Experienced Hiker

  • 3.5 to 4 hours

Inexperienced Hiker

  • 5 to 6 hours

Fox Mountain

This destination lies off any developed and mapped trail system; the use and understanding of GPS and/or map and compass is highly recommended. When traveling off-trail you will experience hazards not realized on a trail, expect more difficult and varying conditions and always lean toward safety as a priority.

How to get there

From the Hamlet of Raquette Lake follow Brown's Tract Road for 0.7 miles to the West Mountain Trail on the right, park here, the mountain is on the opposite side of the road.

Trail Description

Fox Mountain does not have a trail, but it is a very easy and straight forward bushwhack for only about 0.3 miles. You may see this mountain on the map and wonder what's up there, well let me tell you, it's a pretty cool view of Browns Tract Inlet. From the roadside the forest is very open but the slopes are very steep. In a short amount of time you will be on the wooded summit. Pass over the summit to ledges just below. Be very careful here as you approach the view as to not slip on the loose duff under you.

Elevation

~2050'

Elevation Change

~225'

Round Trip Distance

~0.6 miles

Family with Young Kids

  • Not recommended

Experienced Hiker

  • 1 to 2 hours

Inexperienced Hiker

  • Not recommended

Little Sawyer Mountain

This destination lies off any developed and mapped trail system; the use and understanding of GPS and/or map and compass is highly recommended. When traveling off-trail you will experience hazards not realized on a trail, expect more difficult and varying conditions and always lean toward safety as a priority.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 28/30 toward Blue Mountain Lake. Continue for just under 5.0 miles to Sawyer Mountain Trailhead on the left.

Trail Description

Little Sawyer Mountain does not have any trails to its summit, but its access is quite easy. The best parking is at the Sawyer Mountain Trailhead, but you need to walk the roadway for about 0.5 miles to get to the base of the mountain. Parking along the road is a bit narrow, so be very careful in choosing your location.

From the trailhead parking walk south along Route 28/30 for a half mile or so before you jump into the woods. The forest is open hardwoods and very easy to walk through. Initially it is quite flat so you will need to stay on course with few features to lead you other that your GPS or Compass. Soon you will start to climb and start seeing random glacial erratics and small rock faces. Near the top it gets only slightly steeper. A small band of spruce guards the top and just beyond is some of the finest views in the region and hidden from the population.

Elevation

2340'

Distances

~2.8 miles from Sawyer Trailhead--~1.8 miles from Route 28/30

Family with Young Kids

  • Not recommended

Experienced Hiker

  • 3.5 to 4 hours

Out of Shape Hiker

  • Not recommended

Ledge Mountain

This destination lies off any developed and mapped trail system; the use and understanding of GPS and/or map and compass is highly recommended. When traveling off-trail you will experience hazards not realized on a trail, expect more difficult and varying conditions and always lean toward safety as a priority.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 28/30 toward Blue Mountain Lake. Continue for just under 5.5-miles to Rock River Trailhead on the right.

Trail Description

Ledge Mountain, also seen as "Ledger" Mountain on some maps, is appropriately named. Its sheer cliffs on the south side catch the eye of many people driving by. While there is no trail up this peak it can be easily accessed from the Rock River Trail. From the trailhead you will only follow the trail for about 100' before you enter the open hardwood forest. Keeping the small hill to your left you will soon cross a snowmobile trail, there is no need to follow this, it does not go where you need it to. You will start to climb the ridge of the mountain soon after and go over a small bump in front of you. After a small descent you will be on the mountain and starting you final climb. Keep to the right and near the cliffs to have multiple views on the way up. The true summit is a boulder in the middle of the woods, but the best views are right below the summit.

Elevation

2208'

Distances

~1.8 miles

Family with Young Kids

  • Not recommended

Experienced Hiker

  • 2.5 to 3.5 hours

Out of Shape Hiker

  • Not recommended

Wadsworth Mountain

This destination lies off any developed and mapped trail system; the use and understanding of GPS and/or map and compass is highly recommended. When traveling off-trail you will experience hazards not realized on a trail, expect more difficult and varying conditions and always lean toward safety as a priority.

How to get there

From the Hamlet of Raquette Lake follow Brown's Tract Road for 0.7 miles to the West Mountain Trail on the right, park here.

Trail Description

Wadsworth Mountain does not have a trail that goes all the way to the summit, but you can access the ridge from the West Mountain Trail. The forest is very open and the route is extremely straight forward. From the West Mountain Trail you will start your hike along a well-developed trail through an open hardwood forest. The trail drops slightly before starting a gentle climb over a hogback, which is the ridge for Wadsworth. Once atop the hogback and before you start to descend again you will need to head west along the gentle ridge. As you approach the top there is one short steeper pitch that will access you to the open rocky summit.

Elevation

~2080'

Elevation Change

~260'

Round Trip Distance

~1.8 miles

Family with Young Kids

  • Not recommended

Experienced Hiker

  • 2 to 2.5 hours

Inexperienced Hiker

  • Not recommended

Moose River Trail to Slide Off Mountain

This small peak is obscure with no real trail to the summit; but does have a faint herd path to follow once you leave the access trail. GPS, map and compass, and navigation experience is a must.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Rondaxe Road follow Rondaxe Road for 1.4 miles to a small crossover junction between two roads that run parallel to one another. Turn right onto this crossover road then an immediate left. Go 0.5 miles over a bridge and make a right at the next corner onto what is called North Rondaxe Road. Continue for 0.75 miles to the snowmobile trail on the left, this is the trailhead.

Trail Description

From the trailhead the route starts out following a DEC marked snowmobile trail but during the non-winter months it is used as a hiking trail. The trail is quite wide and heavily used by snowmobiles keeping it in good shape. After about 0.4 miles the snowmobile trail splits. Take a right at this intersection and follow the trail toward the Moose River. This section of snowmobile trail is very attractive with several small wetlands, bridges and ample wildflowers. This snowmobile trail will end at a widening on the river, a secondary trail continues but access private land and should not be used.

To access Slide Off Mountain you can start from this widening of the river and take a heading north to locate the ridgeline. There is a faint herd path in this area, but you should be prepared for off-trail navigation. Keep the steep ledges of the mountain to your right and you will soon find yourself at some nice viewing areas out over the river. Be careful atop the ledges they are quite steep. The summit is lacking in views, but if you feel the need to top off on a peak, it lies not much further up the steep slopes.

Elevation

2285'

Round Trip Distance

4.1 miles

2.0 miles, trail only

Estimated Round Trip Time

  • Family with Young Kids: Not recommended
  • Experienced Hiker: 3 to 4 hours
  • Out of Shape Hiker: Mountain not recommended, trail only 2 to 2.5 hours

Gull Lakes

This hike is only accessible by boat from Big Moose Lake

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Big Moose Road in Inlet follow Big Moose Road. Continue to Higby Road on the right and follow here to the car-top boating access.

Trail Description

This 1.2 mile trail will access you to two very attractive back-country ponds—Upper and Lower Gull Lakes. The trail is very moderate with only a small amount of elevation change. However, beavers are very active especially around Lower Gull Lake. It may be that the trail could be underwater in spots and Upper Gull Lake becomes inaccessible. But generally it's in decent condition. There is a nice lean-to on Upper Gull Lake. Please see the page for Big Moose Lake for additional details on the paddle portion of this trip.

Round Trip Distance

2.4 miles

Estimated Round Trip Time

  • Family with Young Kids: 3 to 4 hours
  • Experienced Hiker: 2 to 2.5 hours
  • Out of Shape Hiker: 2.5 to 3 hours

Russia Lake

This hike is only accessible by boat from Big Moose Lake.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Big Moose Road in Inlet follow Big Moose Road. Continue to Higby Road on the right and follow here to the car-top boating access.

Trail Description

This 0.7 mile trail is a very gentle hike that leaves from East Bay on Big Moose Lake. Once on the trail you will have a pleasant stroll through the Pigeon Lake Wilderness as you coast along a nearly flat route. Please see the page for Big Moose Lake for additional details on the paddle portion of this trip.

Round Trip Distance

1.4 miles

Estimated Round Trip Time

  • Family with Young Kids: 1.5 to 2 hours
  • Experienced Hiker: 1 to 1.5 hours
  • Out of Shape Hiker: 1.5 to 2 hours

Mount Frederica

The summit cliffs of Mount Frederica overlook lovely Lake Lila in the William C. Whitney Wilderness Area in Hamilton County. There is a hiking trail from the Lake Lila parking area, or the trail can be accessed by paddlers from the western shore of Lake Lila.

How to Get There

From the intersection of Routes 30 and 28 in Long Lake, proceed 7.1 miles northwest on Route 30 to a left turn onto Sabattis Road (CR 10). (This is a half-circle road, with two access points on Route 30.) Travel 2.9 miles to a left turn. There are a number of signs at this intersection, including a sign for Lake Lila and Little Tupper Lake Headquarters. The sign directs you to the Lake Lila Road (reached in 4.5 miles). After driving 4.5 miles, take a left onto the Lake Lila access road. Travel for 5.6 miles to reach the Lake Lila parking area. The speed limit on this road is 15 mph. A high clearance vehicle is helpful on this rough dirt road, but a low clearance vehicle can make it with great care.

Trail Description

There is a kiosk and trail register in the Lake Lila parking area. The 4.5 mile hiking trail follows an old dirt road in a westerly direction around the north side of Lake Lila. After 1.5 miles, views of Lake Lila appear as the trail reaches the northern edge of the lake. For the next 1.5 miles, there are views of the lake as the trail continues west and then south along the western edge of Lake Lila. At the 3 mile point, a sign points out a right turn for Mount Frederica (with 1.5 miles left to reach the summit). The trail continues on an old dirt road and crosses the old railroad bed. About halfway on this last 1.5 mile section, there is a right turn onto a hiking trail. Watch for the "Trail" sign. The trail gradually climbs up to the cliffs of Mount Frederica. There are 180 degree views overlooking Lake Lila and many mountains. Blue Mountain is a prominent peak in the view-line.

For Paddlers

Paddlers on Lake Lila can access the trail to Mount Frederica from the western shore of Lake Lila. There is an open area where the old Lodge used to be. Just to the right (north) of this location is a sign for camp sites 8 &9. This is a good place to leave your canoe/kayak. There is a sign for the trail at this location. Take the short trail up to the old dirt road and head right for a couple hundred feet to the left turn for the trail to Mount Frederica. (If you take-out farther north, you may need to hike south on the dirt road to pick up the trail.) The description of the 1.5 mile trail up Mount Frederica is the same as above.

Elevation

2170'

Distances

4.5 miles to the summit (1.5 miles to the summit for paddlers from the western shore of Lake Lila)

Family with Young Kids

  • 3 hours to the summit

Experienced Hiker

  • 1.5 to 2 hours to the summit

Out of Shape Hiker

  • 2.5 to 3 hours to the summit

Additional Information

Bicycles are allowed on the Lake Lila Road, but not beyond the parking area on the trail to Mount Frederica.

Winter

Visitors can snowshoe or cross country ski on the Lake Lila Road in winter. It is a seasonal use road that is not plowed or groomed.

West Mountain (Former Fire Tower)

West Mountain is a former fire tower peak, but even without the steel structure it offers good views from its partially open summit. The length of this hike limits its use by a large number of visitors, but on occasion you might witness a tour group in route to the top.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and County Route 2 in Raquette Lake follow County Route 2 into the Village of Raquette Lake. Continue through the village and take a left onto Brown's Tract Road. Follow here for 0.6 miles or so to the trailhead on the right. This trailhead is a bit obscure, but a small sign on a tree marks its location.

Trail Description

From the trailhead you will drop slightly into an open hardwood forest on a trail that is quite narrow and a bit overgrown in areas. There are a couple wet crossings before you reach the trail that comes in from Brown's Tract Ponds. At this intersection take a right and follow an old woods road that is in excellent condition and easy walking. You will pass through an attractive grassy area then quickly back into the woods. You will also pass by several other side trails, be sure to stay on the main trail. Another trail to Raquette Lake (the lake) will come in on the right.

Once you leave the woods road the trail becomes slightly more difficult over rolling hills and eventually to some very steep terrain. The steep terrain will bring you to a moderate walk and then to the summit of West Mountain. The true summit is slightly in the woods where you will also find the survey disk. For the views you will need to remain in the grassy area just prior.

Elevation

2902'

Distances

4.8 miles to the summit

Family with Young Kids

  • 3 to 4 hours to summit, may be too long of a hike for most young children

Experienced Hiker

  • 2 hours to summit

Out of Shape Hiker

  • 2 to 3 hours to summit

Winter Overview

This is a challenging winter climb due mainly to its lack of use. West gets very little snowshoeing attention and it would require the hiker to break many miles of trail.

This trail could be skied in parts, but the upper portion is not recommended for cross-country skiing.

Rock River Trail

The Rock River Trail is a 3-mile trail through a pristine forest that ends at a very scenic area on Rock River. Rolling hills and quiet atmosphere give this trail a real quality.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 30 and Route 28 in Indian Lake follow Route 28/30 toward Blue Mountain Lake for 4.6 miles to the trailhead on the right.

Trail Description

From the trailhead you will start on a soft trail that gets much less use than other trails in the Indian Lake area. You initially work your way over a few rolling hills before you descend to a low land area with Rock Pond through the woods on your left. The pond can be seen slightly through the forest, but no trail actually approaches its shore. The trail will swing from high ground to low ground but eventually stay high above the lake to avoid any wet trail crossings. Wildflowers throughout the year will be very apparent along this area. The trail slowly swings northerly around Stark Hills before it starts to slowly descend and eventually end at the Shore of Rock River. This is a very scenic destination on the river, and if you were so inclined, bringing a telescoping fishing rod and a bit of bait, you could even catch a nice trout dinner.

Distances

To Rock River = 3.0 miles

Family with Young Kids

  • 1.5 hours

Experienced Hiker

  • 1 hour

Out of Shape Hiker

  • 1.25 hours

Winter Overview

This would be an excellent snowshoe or cross-country ski. It doesn't get much winter use so the trail would be untouched in most cases making travel a bit slower and more difficult.

Black Bear Mountain Loop from Route 28

Black Bear Mountain is the big brother, so to speak, of Rocky Mountain. Located so close to the village of Inlet, this peak gets some pretty serious attention from hikers; the summit can be a very crowded location. Black Bear Mountain from Route 28 is the most popular approach, but a secondary approach can be found leaving from Uncas Road. Using the Route 28 trailhead you have an excellent opportunity to create a loop for a slightly longer outing.

How to get there

Follow Route 28 west out of the village of Inlet and in no time you will see the trailhead on the right. This is a large parking area, paved but rough. The Black Bear Mountain Trail is to the right side of the parking area.

Trail Description

One of the nice features of the Black Bear Mountain Trail is that you can loop over the top and connect to another trail making for an interesting day in the woods. The loop will add on time and distance to the trip, but you will get to see different lays of land and spend some time on a lightly used and soft trail. You also have the option to descend via your route in, once you have reached the summit.

From the trailhead you will start off walking along an old rocky woods road and quickly come to a split in the trail, take the right at this time, you will return left at the end of the loop. From here the old road continues for a bit before it turns into more of a foot trail and goes through a wet area over a long attractive boardwalk. At this point, the trail will start to ascend, at times quite steeply. The trail from Seventh Lake will come in on the right in a col between Black Bear and a lower summit; the Seventh Lake Trail can be easily hiked right past and not even noticed. The final approach to the summit is a bit more interesting, as rocky footing starts to be introduced as well as your first views. The summit of Black Bear has several viewing areas to spread out amongst the crowds of people who often frequent this peak.

If you wish to continue on the loop, please read further and have a great trip.

The loop continues over the top of the mountain; it can be hard to locate off the summit, but look closely for markers on the trees and you will find the way. The trail will drop off the summit on a very narrow trail. The trail is easy to follow but in many cases ends up being steep and slippery. The descent is through a different forest type than you were in on the way up. You will be down off the mountain quite quickly and come to the Uncas Road Trail on your right. Don't follow here but head much more left along a grassy trail that shadows the base of Black Bear Mountain. Through this area the forest opens up into mostly hardwoods with wildflowers blooming all around. The lower portion of this loop is quite flat, and for being as flat as it is, there are not too many wet areas to navigate through. It will be 3-miles back to the trail you started in on, but those 3-miles moves by quickly. Once back at the trail intersection you pass on the way in, you will have about 0.75 miles remaining to your vehicle on Route 28.

Elevation

2442'

Distances

Route 28 to the summit = 1.9 miles
Full loop = 6.3 miles

Family with Young Kids

  • 2-hours to summit
  • 4-5 hours for entire loop (loop might be a bit much for most young children)

Experienced Hiker

  • 1-hour to summit
  • 3-hours for entire loop

Out of Shape Hiker

  • 1.5 hours to summit
  • 4 hours for entire loop

Winter Overview

Black Bear is an excellent destination for snowshoeing and does get some moderate winter attention. It may be too much of a hike for young children under winter conditions. The back portion of the loop get very little use in winter, it may require the user to break trail under difficult conditions.

The mountain trail is not recommended for cross-country skiing. The lower portion of the loop could make for a nice cross-country ski if conditions were good.

Coney Mountain

Located right on the border of Hamilton and Franklin Counties, Coney is an outstanding bang-for-your-buck mountain. With ease of access and short distance it is sure to please every member of your family.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 30 and 28N in Long Lake follow Route 30 toward Tupper Lake. Continue for just over 12-miles to the parking area on the right. This is a brand new parking area built by the NYSDEC over the last year.

Trail Description

This mountain trail up Coney Mountain is only about a year old, it was redeveloped to replace an old path that led to its bald round dome. The trail for the majority is very rocky and still quite new, so footing is a bit rough in areas. Following the well-developed trail you will sweep your way around the steep western slopes of the mountain. As the trail steepens a bit, it continues to contour its way around to the northern slopes of Coney Mountain and then meets up with the original trail just below the summit. The final approach is over slab rock, no scrambling is necessary. The views start to open up with Goodman Mountain to the north and Mount Morris to the northeast. The waters of Tupper Lake can be seen to the north as well and the wooded hills of the Horseshoe Lake Wild Forest to the west. As far as views go, this is one of the best in the area and should not be missed.

Elevation

2250'

Distances

Route 30 trailhead to summit – 0.9 miles

Family with Young Kids

  • 45 minutes to summit

Experienced Hiker

  • 30 minutes to summit

Out of Shape Hiker

  • 45 minutes to summit

Winter Overview

Coney makes for an excellent snowshoeing trip for the entire family. Be sure to keep Coney Mountain in mind if you have never snowshoed before and want a perfect spot to get started. This is also an excellent opportunity to introduce kids to the sport. With typical heavy snow and ease of access, this is a popular destination in winter. However, expect the chance of heavy winds and cold wind-chills once you are on the mostly tree-less summit.

This trail is not recommended for cross-country skiing.

Coney Mountain is a small peak in the Adirondack Region of New York State. At only about 2260 Feet, it does not qualify as one of the Adirondack "46'ers", all over 4000 feet, but Coney does offer spectacular 360 degree views of the area.

Directions

From Long Lake, drive north on Rte 30 for approximately 11 miles, just over the Hamilton County / Franklin County line. The parking turnoff on the left side (west) of Rte has plenty of space to park. Cross east over Rte 30 to find the trail hidden in the woods, but marked well after you get off Rte 30. Trailhead GPS point on Route 30: 44.0994252 -74.5293918

This is a great "bushwhack" hike, as there is no formal DEC trail. Little Cathead rises over Woods Lake with cliffs on the southwest side that tower almost 600 feet above the lake shore. The trail head, which is not marked, is opposite a small turnoff/parking area located on the south side of Benson road.

Follow the northern shore for approximately 0.3 mile to the bottom of the mountain. Then you can make the due north bushwack to the top of the hill, which will be about another 0.5 miles. The views to the south over Woods Lake are very nice.

 

Directions

From Route 30, take a left onto Benson Road and travel 4.6 miles to the trailhead. There is no sign for the trailhead, but look for the parking lot on the south (left) side of the road, which is directly opposite the trailhead for the lake and mountain.

This is a great hike to a very interesting and unusual geological chimney formation surrounded with a maze of caves and crevices near the summit. Expert spelunkers and amateur geologists will find this area a delight to explore. The true summit of the mountain is a short hike via a herd path, to the right before the trail to the chimney. From the rocky summit, you get a beautiful 360 degree view of the surrounding area.

 

 

Directions

Drive south on Route 30 from Indian Lake, and at 0.6 mile take a left onto Big Brook Road. Continue driving to the crossroad intersection of Hutchins and Moulton Roads, and turn Right following Big Brook Road. You will reach the parking area at The Cabins at Chimney Mountain 7.8 miles from Route 30. Park at the designated area for hikers.

Rocky Mountain

It's an easy half-mile climb to Rocky Mountain's summit. The sunset and sunrise views from here can be spectacular. It's no wonder this short hike is one of the most popular in the Inlet area, and a great destination for the entire family.

The trail starts off flat but soon become steep. On a wet day the rocks and roots along the trail can be very slippery, so take caution if this is the case, especially on the way back down.

Before the top, there are a few areas where small rock shelves come into the picture. They can easily be avoided, but if you decide to take the direct approach choose your footing carefully, as these sections can be slick in wet conditions. The path levels off just before reaching the open, rocky summit, where views overlooking the Fulton Chain of Lakes await.

Location

Drive west along Route 28 from Inlet, toward Old Forge, and you'll see the parking area on the right. Visitors usually dot the rocky summit above.

Elevation

2,205 feet

Ascent

475 feet

Distance

It's only 0.5 mile from Route 28 to the summit.

Winter Overview

Rocky Mountain is an excellent destination for the entire family to get some snowshoeing experience. Some of the steep areas could potentially have ice, but that can be circumvented. This trail is not recommended for cross-country skiing.

Watch Hill

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 30 toward Speculator. Continue for just over 8-miles to the trailhead on the left, 1-mile past the trailhead for Snowy Mountain.

Trail Description

While the trail up Watch Hill has been around for quite some time it is now marked by the DEC and they have developed a new trailhead.
From the trailhead you will hike back along the short section of new trail to an old forest road and follow this for a bit to the foot trail that will come in on the right. The trail is well marked so don't worry about the few intersections along the way. There is a trail marked as a horse trail which is a much easier approach to the summit, but it is a bit longer and not as exciting, and a bit wet and muddy. The foot trail is much more fun as it goes up over some steeper rock lips and eventually to the ridgeline. There are outstanding views of Snowy Mountain and Indian Lake.
There is a spur trail that leads down to the Shore of Indian Lake and a nice beach if you wish to add a bit of distance to your travels.

Elevation

2125'

Distances

2.0 miles, round trip

Family with Young Kids

  • 1 hour to summit

Experienced Hiker

  • 45 minutes to summit

Out of Shape Hiker

  • 45 minutes to summit

Wakely Mountain

Wakely Mountain is one the Adirondack 100-highest peaks and is also home of the tallest fire tower still standing in the Adirondacks as well. You will feel it sway in the breeze as you climb its many levels of steps to the cab. The fire observer's cabin is located near the summit as well.

How to get there

From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake follow Route 28/30 toward Blue Mountain Lake. Continue for just over 2.25 miles to Cedar River Road on the left. Continue on Cedar River Road for around 12 miles to the trailhead on the right.

Trail Description

From the trailhead you will be start out following an old woods road for over almost 2 miles to a small beaver pond/marsh on the left. Take a second to walk down the short spur trail to check it out; this would be a fantastic moose sighting area. From here the route enters the woods on a much narrower trail and moves quickly over several small hogbacks. Once the climbing starts it does not stop for much longer than a few feet before staring in again. The terrain is pretty good with only a few sections of really tough footing. Just below the summit is the location of the old helicopter pad on the right. The trail will then meander its way to the summit area where the views are lacking from ground level. You will need to climb the fire tower, at least in part to be awarded the fantastic views.

Elevation

3,744 feet

Distances

Trailhead to the summit = 3 miles

Family with Young Kids

  • 2.5 hours to summit

Experienced Hiker

  • 2 Hours to summit

Out of Shape Hiker

  • 2.5 hours to summit

Winter Overview

The last portion of Cedar River Road is not open in the winter. With the road closed it would add on many miles of road walking or skiing to approach the trail. While it gets done on occasion, be aware that you will have an extended day in the woods. The trail itself may or may not be touched due to less frequent climbing.

The trail section is not recommended for cross-country skiing.

Directions

Location: 12 miles southwest of Indian Lake From Indian Lake take Rte 28N/30 west for 2.2 miles, then make a left onto Cedar River Road (past the golf course) for another 11.5 miles. There is a sign-in book at the parking lot, and the gravel road leading to the mountain offers an easy 1.9 mile warm-up.

An 8.8 mile hike, easy to moderate. Most of this walk is on a level dirt road which leads to a large grassy clearing on the lakeshore where the Nehasane Lodge Great Camp once stood. A moderate climb leads up to a ledge overlooking beautiful Lake Lila.

(1.8 miles RT, moderate) This hike follows an old jeep road to the summit where views can be attained from the restored fire tower. A fire observer's cabin is also located on the summit.

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